PODCAST: Critical Nymphing Concepts #3 — Suspension Advantages– S10, Ep3

by | Jan 28, 2024 | 10 comments

 The Troutbitten Podcast is available everywhere that you listen to your podcasts.

** Note **  The Podcast Player, along with links to your favorite players is below.

In the third part of this critical nymphing concepts series, we consider the advantages and disadvantages of fishing with a suspender. 

We cover the following
  • Indicator styles and why the type matters
  • Not all indicators are created equal
  • Choosing tight line or indy, or combing both
  • What you lose by adding and indy
  • What you gain by adding an indy
  • Complications of an indy style
  • What is commonly missed when using an indy
  • Reading an indicator
  • A few more tips  . . .
Resources

READ: Troutbitten | It’s a Suspender, Not Just an Indicator
PODCAST: Troutbitten | Nymphing Tight Line to the Indicator Style — Tight Line Advantage to the Indicator
READ: Troutbitten | The Backing Barrel Might Be the Best Sighter Ever
READ: Troutbitten | Tight Line to the Indicator — a Mono Rig Variant
READ: Troutbitten | Your Indicator is Too Big
READ: Troutbitten | The Dorsey Yarn Indicator — Everything You Need to Know and  a Little More

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Season Ten of the Troutbitten Podcast continues next week with episode four. So look for that in your Troutbitten podcast feed.

Fish hard, friends.

 

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Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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10 Comments

  1. Thank you for this podcast. I started fly fishing after retirement at 70 yrs old and am lucky enough to fish in English chalk streams thanks to an angling society. It took me nearly two years to catch my first wild brown trout, but it was worth the wait and learning process. Your podcast is both informative and useful. Thank you both.

    Reply
  2. Say good bye to tungsten say hello to drop shot the old bass technique works very well with trout

    Reply
    • Hi MIke.

      I really enjoy drop shot nymphing, and I do it a lot. I published a six-part series on drop shot tactics, found here:

      https://troutbitten.com/category/drop-shot-nymphing/

      Personally, I’d never give up tungsten beads, weighted flies or traditional split shot tactics either. Drop shot just doesn’t work all the time as well as the other tactics. Likewise, the other way around.

      Cheers.
      Dom

      Reply
  3. A good principle I’ve picked up from stillwater (thanks Phil Rowley) is the deeper the indicator is set, the closer you should fish it.

    The reason for applying this in stillwater is for reaction time – the indication of a take is delayed in proportion to the distance between the fly and the indicator. If you fish too far away, you don’t have enough time to set the hook before the fish has spit the fly out. This effect is stronger when you introduce currents that obscure the connection between indicator and fly, particularly if you fish deeper.

    Reply
    • Good stuff. I understand your points. However . . .

      “he deeper the indicator is set, the closer you should fish it.”

      I tend to fish further away when I’m fishing deeper, simply because I probably can’t wade the water. I always have the mindset to get as close as I can. And if I’m having to set an indy deep, I likely can’t wade very close to the target either.

      Make sense?
      Dom

      Reply
  4. For sure. It’s better to fish and risk a miss than to not fish at all. In a river you also have the benefit of it being harder for the fish to spit the fly because of the tension between the indi, tippet and fly generated by the current.

    Reply
  5. I love your podcast and articles. You have literally changed my life.
    Everything in the same lane is so Vimportant. I have no idea how to do that???
    Gratefully.
    Doug

    Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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