Articles With the Tag . . . gear

1000 Day Gear Review: Grip Studs — Unmatched Traction for Wading Boots

Grip Studs are single point carbide tipped studs with an auger style bit. The result is sticky traction, incredible durability and studs that don’t fall out. Simply put, they’re the best studs I’ve ever used.

Here’s more . . .

VIDEO: Wading Belt Carrying System

How can we keep our stuff with us, make it easily accessible and not be slowed down or fatigued by extra weight? Answer: Carry the heavy things on your hips.

Most anglers focus on whether to choose a chest pack, vest, sling pack, hip pack, lanyard or something else. We think of carrying fly boxes, tippet, leaders and other incidentals. But what about the net? What about water, a wading staff, a camera or anything else with extra weight? Carrying these items should not be a secondary consideration. As the heaviest things among your gear, how you carry them is of primary importance.

The heavy stuff is best carried on your hips, so the most critical part of your carrying system is probably the wading belt. And most wading belts are not up to the task.

What Hand Should Turn the Fly Reel?

In the short term, reeling with the casting hand might lose fish. But in the long term, it encourages poor line maintenance principles.

In this article I give a lot of thought to the various inefficiencies and handicaps that hurt when reeling with the casting hand . . .

Recommended Gear Pages Updated! Also With Troutbitten Crew Favorites

I’ve revamped the Troutbitten Recommended Gear Pages to reflect not only my current favorites, but the preferences of the guys whom you’ve also come to know through the podcast: Austin, Matt, Bill, Trevor and Josh.

So here are our favorite rods, reels, boots, waders, packs, vests, lines, leaders, tools, jackets, layers, vises, books and more . . .

VIDEO: Wading Belt Carrying System

VIDEO: Wading Belt Carrying System

Perhaps the most overlooked part of a good carrying system is the wading belt. Anglers love their gear. We all do. But how can we keep our stuff with us, make it easily accessible and not be slowed down or fatigued by the extra weight? Answer: Carry the heavy things...

What Hand Should Turn the Fly Reel?

What Hand Should Turn the Fly Reel?

Let’s keep this one simple for a moment. Cast with one hand and reel with the other, because it makes good sense. Because it’s more efficient by a mile — it requires less movement and there’s less chance for error — and because using your off hand for all line...

100 Day Gear Review — Skwala Carbon Waders

100 Day Gear Review — Skwala Carbon Waders

Our fly fishing gear takes a lot of abuse, and eventually all waders leak, boots fall apart and pack zippers fail. But how long can it hold up? How well is it built? The 100 Day Gear Review Series on Troutbitten takes a look at how gear is performing after the century...

100 Day Gear Review — Orvis Pro Wading Boots

100 Day Gear Review — Orvis Pro Wading Boots

Fly fishing gear breaks down. Waders leak, boots fall apart and pack zippers fail. The stitching at the seams of all this stuff takes a lot of abuse, so how long can it hold up? How well is it built?

The 100 Day Gear Review Series on Troutbitten takes a look at how gear is performing after the century benchmark. The Orvis Pro Wading Boots have outperformed my expectations. They are light but extra-solid. They are durable, comfortable and have excellent support in all the right ways. These are great boots . . .

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When Gear Gets In the Way

When Gear Gets In the Way

No matter what we’re into, there’s a time when the learning of skills reaches a critical mass, when it’s time to do rather than read more about it and buy more gear.
. . .There’s a time for learning. There’s time for preparation. And then there’s time for doing — for putting all of it into practice, making the casts, covering water and catching fish . . .

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100 Day Gear Review: Smith Creek Rod Rack (with VIDEO)

100 Day Gear Review: Smith Creek Rod Rack (with VIDEO)

Transporting a fly rod is not as straightforward as it may seem. But it can be. For many of us, our preference to keep the fly rod rigged and ready to fish presents some challenges.

For years now, the Smith Creek Rod Rack has been my perfect solution. The Rock Rack stores up to seven rods inside the vehicle, keeping them secure and away from passengers — from kids, dogs or mishaps. Attachment is easy, the design is smart and the Smith Creek build is solid.

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