VIDEOS

Fish Hard

I published the first Troutbitten video in the spring of 2017, in an effort to show the things that cannot be written or photographed.

Years later, I brought Josh Darling, owner of Wilds Media, into the project. His art, his eye and his film expertise make Josh the perfect partner for this work.

In 2022, Josh and I began the Troutbitten Tips series on the Troutbitten YouTube channel. These are short, helpful and unique tips for a life on the water.

We’ve also added a series called, Fly Fishing the Mono Rig. This ongoing collection of videos highlights the versatility and the nuances of this hybrid fly fishing system.

A dedicated Gear Review series just launched on the channel, and who knows what’s next.

Troutbitten videos teach tactics and share stories that keep the river in our minds and in our hearts.

From the video, The River Doesn’t Owe You Anything. (Fall, 2020) Photo by Josh Darling

WHERE TO WATCH

All Troutbitten videos are found on the Troutbitten YouTube channel.

Explore the playlists. Subscribe to the channel, and Leave a comment.

Every Troutbitten Video also has a companion article, with more information and an embedded video link.

Thanks for watching.

Five Keys to Reading the Sighter (with VIDEO)

Five Keys to Reading the Sighter (with VIDEO)

Control. Options. Precision. These are the most attractive aspects of fishing a tight line system, and the sighter is the key to it all.

A sighter is more than a strike indicator. It also shows depth, angle, speed and contact. It points to our flies and takes away the guesswork. For an angler who learns to read all of this on the sighter, that colored line above the water provides a most significant advantage to the underwater game . . .

(VIDEO) Finding Your Best Fishing Angles

(VIDEO) Finding Your Best Fishing Angles

Choosing your casting position based on visibility, working with the light rather than fighting against it, is not an intuitive decision. But by simply moving our body, by wading up, down or over, we change the light, the highlights and the glare on the water. In this way we can see through a section of river from the left side that was under impossible glare from the right . . .

(VIDEO) The Tight Line Advantage for Nymphs, Indicators, Streamers and Dry Dropper

(VIDEO) The Tight Line Advantage for Nymphs, Indicators, Streamers and Dry Dropper

For effective, convincing underwater presentations of flies to a trout, the tight line advantage is the cornerstone concept. Nothing else is more important.

Because a river is composed of changing and moving seams, defeating that unwanted drag is the nymph angler’s ongoing battle. How do we defeat that drag? With the tight line advantage. Watch this video to see it in action.

Troutbitten Fly Box — The Blue Collar Worker (with VIDEO)

Troutbitten Fly Box — The Blue Collar Worker (with VIDEO)

Show up on time, do your job and have a little fun while you’re at it. Then go home and do it all over again tomorrow. That’s a blue collar worker. It’s a Pheasant Tail with a CDC collar. It has a little disco for the rib and a hot spot collar. It’s simple, reliable and effective . . .

(VIDEO) Three Great Ways to Create Tag Droppers

(VIDEO) Three Great Ways to Create Tag Droppers

With three good solutions for creating tag droppers, there’s a method for every moment. And by getting each of these under your fingers, by practicing them and being comfortable, you’ll find uses for all of these methods as you work up a river.

100 Day Gear Review: Smith Creek Rod Rack (with VIDEO)

100 Day Gear Review: Smith Creek Rod Rack (with VIDEO)

Transporting a fly rod is not as straightforward as it may seem. But it can be. For many of us, our preference to keep the fly rod rigged and ready to fish presents some challenges.

For years now, the Smith Creek Rod Rack has been my perfect solution. The Rock Rack stores up to seven rods inside the vehicle, keeping them secure and away from passengers — from kids, dogs or mishaps. Attachment is easy, the design is smart and the Smith Creek build is solid.

(VIDEO) Four Moments to Shoot Line

(VIDEO) Four Moments to Shoot Line

Part of what distinguishes fly fishing from other styles of fishing is retrieving line by hand. But then we need to get the line back out there. When should we shoot the line back through the rod guides? No one ever seems to talk about these options. But there are four of them.

We can shoot line on the pickup, on the backcast, on the forward cast and on the forward cast following the power stroke . . .

(VIDEO) Fly Fishing the Mono Rig — You Need a Line Hand

(VIDEO) Fly Fishing the Mono Rig — You Need a Line Hand

Fishing a full Mono Rig system allows for abundant versatility — but not without the line hand. You have two hands, so use them both. Get that second hand off your hip, and use it for slack recovery, opening up a range of options, adjustments and efficiencies.

Don’t Hate Split Shot — Have a System (with VIDEO)

Don’t Hate Split Shot — Have a System (with VIDEO)

You need the right tools, the right shot and the right methods for using all of it. None of this is complicated, but simplicity in fishing is often elusive, until time on the water eventually reveals what is best. Honestly, I believe there’s no better way to carry and use split shot than what is shown here . . .

(VIDEO) Fly Fishing the Mono Rig — Casting vs Lobbing

(VIDEO) Fly Fishing the Mono Rig — Casting vs Lobbing

Turnover is the fundamental difference between spin casting and fly casting. And all good fly casts, with fly line or otherwise, allow the line/leader to turnover in the air and then hit the water. That’s the difference between casting and lobbing. Without good turnover, we are simply lobbing the line.

Remember this: lobbing is limiting. And a good casting approach, with great turnover, introduces a wide range of options . . .

VIDEO: Real Dead Drifts — Up Top and Underneath

VIDEO: Real Dead Drifts — Up Top and Underneath

A dead drift is the most common presentation in fly fishing for trout, because it imitates their most common food forms. We want a dead drift on both a dry fly and a nymph. But what is it?

It’s a one-seam drift that travels at the speed of the current without tension from the attached tippet. That’s hard to achieve, but it is possible by first understanding what a dead drift looks like, both on the surface with a dry fly and below the surface with a nymph . . .

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