Troutbitten on the WadeOutThere Podcast

by | Mar 31, 2021 | 3 comments

Back in February, I had the pleasure of talking shop with Jason Shemchuk of the WadeOutThere podcast. It is now published and live wherever you listen to podcasts. (Links at the end of the article.)

Jason is a fellow angler who authors an excellent website and fishes with similar goals and philosophies as my own. He’s also a talented painter. Those articles, paintings and podcasts can be found at WadeOutThere.com.

I thoroughly enjoyed our discussion of about ninety minutes, and I hope you’ll give it a listen. It’s a tactical but casual conversation that digs deep. I probably talked too fast and too often, and I got excited about the material, as usual. But those who know me will tell you that this is about as much DOM as there is anywhere on tape. That’s a tribute to Jason, because he’s easy to talk with and steers an interview with grace.

Here are a few of the topics we cover. (Many of these topics are supported by Troutbitten articles, and they are linked in orange.)

Ep. 33

This is Episode Thirty-Three of the WadeOutThere podcast. You can find it by searching wadeoutthere in your favorite podcast app or by clicking one of the following direct links:

The WadeOutThere podcast page

WadeOutThere on iTunes

WadeOutThere on Spotify

Thanks again to Jason Shemchuk for a great conversation. I hope we do it again sometime.

Fish hard, friends.

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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3 Comments

  1. Extremely entertaining and informative. Fantastic listen! One of the best podcast I’ve heard. Definitely not too much talking. Suggest bringing this kind of upbeat enthusiasm to your videos.

    Reply
  2. Super informative – answered quite a few questions and concerns. Ate it up. Thx

    Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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