The first time out, a fly needs a good showing

by | Apr 16, 2021 | 1 comment


 

Today’s article is a remix from a few years back. You can find it here:

The first time out, a fly needs a good showing

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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1 Comment

  1. As a fellow fly tier I can definitely relate to field testing new patterns. I have a jar full of one-hit-wonders…., and another container half full of flies I’ll simply call: Stood-up at the dance! Good stuff. I enjoyed the read!

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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