Fly Fishing in the Winter — Ice in the Guides?

by | Feb 19, 2021 | 1 comment

Today’s article is a remix from the winter series. You can find it here:

Fly Fishing in the Winter — Ice in the Guides?

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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1 Comment

  1. Your thoughts on using micro fly clips to connect tippet to tippet or even leader to tippet. One could use any knot and the attachment points are easy to see. The clips are light and the profile is as thin as an Orvis tippet knot and thinner than a surgeon’s knot.
    Also, is there a role for tiny swivels to reduce line twisting from repeated casts?

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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