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The Pros and Cons of a Longer Fly Rod

If you’re thinking about a new fly rod (and who isn’t), it’s helpful to understand the upside and downside of extra length. Whether your intentions for the new rod are tight line tactics, streamers, dries, or a versatile tool that can easily tackle all of these, the advantages and disadvantages of extra length in a fly rod are important to understand . . .

River and Rain

A Blue Winged Olive hovers and flutters next to River’s face for a moment, and he sees it. (River doesn’t miss much.) Tilting his head, he’s just about to lunge for the mayfly when a large raindrop knocks the hapless Olive from the air — more confusion in the life of a puppy. I chuckle, and River relaxes while I start to tell him a story . . .

Get Short and Effective Drifts with Your Fly

Wild and wise trout demand from the angler a natural presentation of the fly. Trout are a difficult fish to fool. So the consistent fisherman learns to successfully drift flies that look like something the trout is used to eating — something that appears natural.

However, the most natural drift of the fly happens over a short portion of the drift. And usually, the angler who casts more often is more successful . . .

Fly Casting — Five Tips For Better Mending

Mending is a bit of a lost art in fly fishing, and I meet fewer and fewer people with much skill for it. Remember to start with slack. Then keep your mends small and crisp. Mend like you mean it, and be willing to make mistakes. Have fun out there . . .

Fly Casting — Shoot Line on the Pickup

The pickup is one of the most overlooked aspects of the casts. And by learning to shoot line on the pickup, the options for delivering our flies with precision and with subtle variation are wide open . . .

Nymphing: The Top Down Approach

The biggest misconception in nymphing is that our flies should bump along the bottom. Get it down where the trout are, they say. Bounce the nymph along the riverbed, because that’s the only way to catch trout. We’re told to feel the nymph tick, tick, tick across the rocks, and then set the hook when a trout eats. With apologies to all who have uttered these sentiments and given them useless ink, that is pure bullshit.

Here’s how and why to avoid the bottom, fish more effectively and catch more trout with a top down approach . . .

Fishing Alone

I swear I fish best when I’m alone. I can’t prove it without a witness, of course, but I guess I don’t care to verify it anyway . . . and that’s the point.

Fishing the mountains always granted me the serenity of simple thoughts, a soul laid bare to the open wilderness and a peace of mind. Then usually, that’s where I left it — somewhere alongside the rocks and flowing water . . .

Stop Trying to See Your Streamer

Watching your streamer is fun. It’s educational, and it helps to dial in great action on the fly. But if you’re not careful, you’ll start moving the fly so you can see it instead of moving the fly to attract a trout . . .

Fear No Snag Emblem Sticker

$5.00

Fear no snag. Have a little faith. Dare to make the next cast far back under the tree limbs and into the shadowy pockets. There ya go. Fish on!

— — —

  • Sticker is 5X5 inches
  • Printed with a UV and weather resistant finish
  • When mounted as a window decal on your vehicle, this Troutbitten sticker serves as inspiration to go fishing instead of running errands, every time you get in the car.

Tight Line and Euro Nymphing: Leading vs Tracking vs Guiding

Most anglers seem to think that tight line nymphing is just one thing -- as if there's a single way to do all of this. The logical assumption, at first, is that you can learn this style and then polish it up until the new-to-you tactic is under your belt. Then maybe...

Tight Line Nymphing — Contact Can Be Felt at the Rod Tip

** This is Part Three of a short Troutbitten series about contact, feel and sight while tight line nymphing. This all reads a lot better if you first visit  Parts ONE (Strike Detection is Visual)  and TWO (How Much of this is Feel?) ** -- -- -- -- -- -- So there we...

Fly Fishing Strategies: No Limits — Fish every type of weight available

Do you use weighted flies or split shot? It’s a common question with a flawed premise. Why choose? Why limit yourself to one or the other? And why use only one at a time? Unless you’re a dry-fly-only angler, you need weight to get flies under the surface and down to...

Obsessions

Just after one-o-clock, I glanced up from my notebook and saw the rhythmic taillights of a small USPS Jeep outside my studio window. Its red lamps brightened and dimmed rhythmically through a misting rain and a spring fog which the afternoon could not shake off. The...

Streamside | Kelly Galloup with Reno Fly Shop Podcast

Sinking into a podcast while tying flies or traveling to the river is one of my favorite ways to relax and learn something at the same time. Reno Fly Shop has put out some fantastic podcasts lately, and their latest two part — nearly two hour — chat with Kelly Galloup...

Relocation as a Productive Fishing Strategy

** This post is from contributing author, Pat Burke. ** Twenty minutes after I posted the Take Five article, last week, I received this message from my friend, Pat Burke: “Just so you know, I strongly disagree with your post today.” He followed that with a smiley...

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