Live the Stream, the Joe Humphreys documentary film, is screening in State College for Hump’s birthday

by | Jan 6, 2019 | 8 comments

 

Trust me on this. Take two minutes and thirty seconds to watch this trailer . . .

 

I get chills every time I view that. And I’m flat out excited to be part of the next screening of this film. On Friday, January 18, 2019 at the State Theatre in State College, Pennsylvania, Live the Stream is showing at 6:00 and 9:00 pm. The evening is a celebration of Joe Humphreys’ 90th Birthday. (Full details below.)

From the Directors

Live The Stream is an intimate portrayal of Pennsylvania’s fly fishing legend, Joe Humphreys, a man who was born to fish, lives to teach, and strives to pass on a respect for our waters.

This beautiful documentary follows fly fishing legend, Joe Humphreys for one year both on and off the water as he shares the sport he loves with others. From teaching youth to helping Veterans, going after personal records, and spearheading a conservation dream – this intimate portrayal is a tribute to the power of positive influence, the richness of family and friendships, and Joe’s invitation to everyone to step into his fountains of youth, his streams.

Troutbitten

Friends and Troutbitten regulars know how much I credit Joe Humphreys for my own deep dive into fly fishing. In fact, the name for this company, Troutbitten, comes from Humphreys’ book, Trout Tactics.

 

 

“Clyde new I was a trout-bitten kid, obsessed with fishing, and that I fished every day. He’d watch me and give a knowing nod and smile as I pedalled by on my bicycle, fly rod across the handle bars, fly box and peanut-butter sandwiches piled in the wire basket.” — Joe Humphreys, Trout Tactics

 

So this film is one I’ve been waiting for. And if you love fly fishing, if you love finding wild trout between the watery woods and mountains, Joe is your guy. I’m so looking forward to watching this film from directors Lucas and Meigan Bell. And I hope to see you there.

 

Here are the Event Details

When: Friday, January 18th

Screening Times: 6:30 pm, 9:00 pm

Tickets: $20 + $3.50 State Theatre service fee

Where: State Theatre – 130 W College Ave State College PA 16801

Official Site: www.livethestreamfilm.com

Follow us: www.facebook.com/livethestreamfilm

 

More from the Directors

Joe Humphreys’ 90th Birthday Celebration and Fundraiser at the State Theatre.

Join us on Friday, January 18, 2019 for a very special event in State College, PA! Joe Humphreys is turning 90-YEARS-YOUNG and what better way to celebrate than with special screenings of his award-winning documentary, Live The Stream: The Story of Joe Humphreys, at the State Theatre! Joe, the filmmakers, and other cast will be in attendance for this fundraiser party. Come watch & support the film before it’s released to the public, pick up some merchandise, hang with Joe, his family and friends, and cheers the legend himself. You don’t want to miss this!

Please like the Live the Stream Facebook page for updates and more information about upcoming screenings.

www.facebook.com/livethestreamfilm

 

 

I hope to see you on January 18th.

Fish hard friends.

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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8 Comments

  1. I don’t know Joe being I have never met him, but I know a fellow who has met him. I am told he is just a wonderful man. I have watched numerous times a video on Youtube where he teaches nymph fishing. Men like him are one in a million. I hope I can see this film at some point in the future.

    Best, Sam

    Reply
  2. I’ve never met him either, but I know the legend. What I did not know was that dude was JACKED as a younger man! Holy crap. He looks like he coulda been a slot receiver, or a centerfielder, or some such. It’s no wonder he’s still a vigorous man, mentally and physically – at 90. He’s a physical marvel.

    Reply
  3. Damn. Don’t think I will be able to make it back to Dear Old State for this. Sounds like a phenomenal event. Joe is such a classy and fun guy. I know you’ll enjoy the hell out of this.

    Reply
  4. What a great gentleman, and a credit to the sport of fly fishing!

    Reply
  5. What a great guy, and a credit to fly fishing.

    Reply
  6. Just seeing a photo of Joe’s face makes me happy (and sad).

    Reply
  7. Thank you Dom for posting this. I would have never found out about this with out your site. I have to say what a great evening, really good movie and an amazing man. Thanks again on another great tip.

    Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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