How To Make A Rainbow Trout Look Cool

by | Dec 14, 2014 | 0 comments

This post is from contributing author, Pat Burke.

We’ve all been there before.  You are fishing on a stream with a large population of wild brown trout.  You hook into a fish that is much larger than any fish you’ve ever caught out of that stream.  Your heart instantly starts to race and the anticipation grows the longer you are fighting the fish.  You wait for that first glimpse of buttery gold to confirm what you have been hoping for.

DSC_0327

 

You anticipate the slight cast of blue around the gill plate

DSC_0039

Or the bright red adipose fin.

DSCN1003

The fight is drawing to an end and you are finally getting the fish up off the bottom.  Then you see it.  That pale silver mutt.

You curse and quickly net the fish.   All of the excitement quickly drains and all you are left with is disappointment. It’s probably not even worth taking a picture but you do anyway because it’s a big fish.   It’s a rushed photo job.  You’re kind of indifferent and you don’t take the time to set up for a good picture.   The lighting is all wrong, the tripod isn’t set up right, the picture is off center, and you’re not smiling.   Then you end up with something like this.  Loser.

IMGP0046

You vow never to show that picture to any of your fishing friends.  What a horrible experience for you and fish alike.

So let me back up a bit and explain to those unfamiliar with our area why a big rainbow is a let down.  Almost any stream in central PA has wild trout in it.  Many of the tiny mountain streams have wild brookies in them and any of the larger waters have an overwhelming wild brown trout population.  Even with the huge wild trout population, the Pennsylvania Fish Commission insists on stocking rainbows in many of these waters.  As most people know, rainbows are a much more gullible fish than a brown trout.  Couple that with being stocked and you end up with an extremely willing, gluttonous fish, that will eat almost anything that floats by.  The fly below was tied by my 5 year old son.  As a father, I am ecstatic that he is picking up the mechanics of fly tying at a young age.  However, no fish should ever eat this.  A freshly stocked rainbow trout would.  I’d bet my Helios on it.

DSC_0409

I’m not opposed to all rainbow trout.  I’ve caught beautiful leopard rainbow trout in Alaska with a vivid pink stripe and spots throughout.  I’ve also caught the hard fighting wild bows of the West Branch of the Delaware river.  Both are great fish.  The fish I despise are the freshly stocked lackluster rainbows.  We’ve given them many names over the years –from mutts to second class citizens.

Luckily Dom and I  have come up with a way to make stocked rainbow pictures cool again.  Give a thumbs up and squeeze out a smile!

Share This Article . . .

Since 2014 and 600 articles deep
Troutbitten is a free resource for all anglers
Your support is greatly appreciated

– Explore These Post Tags –

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

More from this Category

Relocation as a Productive Fishing Strategy

Relocation as a Productive Fishing Strategy

** This post is from contributing author, Pat Burke. ** Twenty minutes after I posted the Take Five article, last week, I received this message from my friend, Pat Burke: “Just so you know, I strongly disagree with your post today.” He followed that with a smiley...

Deja Vu- What You Can Learn From Taking A Photo

Deja Vu- What You Can Learn From Taking A Photo

** This post is from contributing author, Pat Burke. ** With the advances in camera equipment and the rise of social media as a way of sharing photos, photography is becoming a larger part of the fly fishing experience.  It is a simple way to convey your experiences...

An Interview With Rich Strolis — Catching Shadows

An Interview With Rich Strolis — Catching Shadows

** This post is from contributing author, Pat Burke. ** Rich Strolis is known around the fly fishing community for his innovative patterns.  There is a long list of flies that have his name on them: the Ice Pick, Busted Stone, Hog Snare, Rock Candy Larva, Cellar...

Chillin’ With Montana Matt

Chillin’ With Montana Matt

This post is from contributing author, Pat Burke. Back in August I was moping around the house for weeks straight belly aching about how much I missed Grobe. I made a point to bring it up at least a couple times a week to my wife. My whole surreptitious plan was to...

What do you think?

Be part of the Troutbitten community of ideas.
Be helpful. And be nice.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Recent Articles

Recent Posts

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

Pin It on Pinterest