Articles With the Tag . . . casting

What Hand Should Turn the Fly Reel?

In the short term, reeling with the casting hand might lose fish. But in the long term, it encourages poor line maintenance principles.

In this article I give a lot of thought to the various inefficiencies and handicaps that hurt when reeling with the casting hand . . .

The Corner Cast — Rounding the Corner Might Be Better Than a Roll Cast (with VIDEO)

Rounding the corner with a Corner Cast often outperforms a Roll Cast. It’s faster, more efficient and easier. But remember, it requires great casting from, with good line speed and crisp stops. That’s where good fly casting always begins. So develop a good baseline and everything else will follow. . . .

Land With Contact or Without, When Using a Tuck Cast — Tight Line and Euro Nymphing

The tuck cast presents a fly-first entry, from very steep and vertical with extra slack, to almost flat, with immediate contact. That’s how flexible the tuck cast is. It’s useful. In fact, it’s critical to how I present nymphs and streamers.

If You Can’t Fish Dry Flies, You’re Missing the Point

The fundamental kernel of fly fishing lies in the angler’s ability to cast and manipulate line, leader and tippet, to send not just a fly to the target, but to also control what that fly is attached to, both in the cast and throughout the drift. This is what separates fly fishing from conventional tackle. And nothing teaches or trains an angler better in this concept, revealing the options inherent, better than fishing dry flies . . .

The Hop Mend (with VIDEO)

The Hop Mend (with VIDEO)

Mending is a skill unique to fly fishing. And good mending seems to elude all but the best anglers. Bad mending is hard to watch, because it does more harm than good — actually introducing drag and hurting the natural drift of a fly. But skillful mending extends...

False Casting is a Waste of Time

False Casting is a Waste of Time

There are no flying fish in Montana, not in Pennsylvania, and not anywhere. Norman Maclean’s line in A River Runs Through It sums this up: One reason Paul caught more fish than anyone else was that he had his flies in the water more than anyone else. "Brother," he...

Flies and Weights

Flies and Weights

This is the direct advantage of knowing your weights. Fly changes become more deliberate and less experimental. Efficiency improves, as does your confidence to read water and the ability to fish it well.

Knowing your weights and measures is about understanding how to balance the elements of your fishing rig. It’s a give and take. But it’s up to you to first know what is being balanced. It’s the design of the leader, the weight of the flies, material resistance and distance. Put numbers to these things, and know your stats . . .

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Distance: Know Your Weights and Measures — Part Two

Distance: Know Your Weights and Measures — Part Two

Making adjustments is the key to consistent fly fishing. It’s what long-term anglers love about this game. It’s how we solve the daily puzzles. And many of those adjustments are based on our thought processes around weights and measures.

It matters. And the easiest place to start is to know your distances. Tackle that first . . .

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Maybe You’re Holding the Fly Rod Wrong

Maybe You’re Holding the Fly Rod Wrong

Finding the fulcrum with your trigger finger, and cradling the rod in your hand makes for effortless casting. If your rod hand aches at the end of the day, you’re doing it wrong.

Everything about casting and drifting improves by holding the rod with barely enough pressure to keep it in your hand. The fish will follow.

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Nymphing — Free Fall and the Drift

Nymphing — Free Fall and the Drift

After the nymph falls into position, we want it to spend some time there. But if we constantly set at the end of the fall, the nymph never has the chance to drift, and the trout don’t get an opportunity to eat on anything but the drop.

A good drift should follow the drop. The free fall and the drift are a successful pair. And they work best together . . .

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