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The Rigging | Drop Shot Nymphing on a Tight Line Rig — Pt.4

There are plenty of ways to build a drop shot rig. This one is built for finesse. Rarely is much weight required, because the rest of the leader is literally designed for getting the flies down — to allow light weights to fall quickly . . .

Podcast: A Fly Fishing Life, and Doing the Hard Things — S3-Ep9

The rewards are in that work. The enjoyment is in the journey. But it’s also pretty sweet to be standing midstream among the best hatch of the season, with a precision casting stroke carrying the fly into the ring of every rise. Set the hook, and you know that you’ve earned it.

Prepare, practice and enjoy the payoff. . . .

What water type? Where are they eating?

Fast, heavy, deep runs have always been my favorite water type to fish. I can spend a full day in the big stuff. I love the mind-clearing washout of whitewater. No average sounds penetrate it. And the never ending roar of a chunky run is mesmerizing. I also enjoy the wading challenge. The heaviest water requires not just effort, but a constant focus and a planned path to keep you upright and on two feet. Constant adjustment is needed to stay balanced, and one slip or misstep ends up in a thorough dunking. It reminds me of the scaffold work I did on construction crews in my twenties. I always enjoyed being a few stories up, because the workday flew by. When every movement means life or death, you’d better stay focused. I always liked that . . .

Fly Casting — Don’t Reach (with VIDEO)

But, what about that pretty magazine pose? What about those videos of nymph fishermen with their arms high and extended, reaching the fly rod out to maximum length? It’s silly. It’s unnecessary. And it won’t last for long.

Reaching is an unsustainable body position at any age. Reaching the arm takes power from the forward cast. And by keeping the elbow in a natural and relaxed position, casting accuracy and delivery options improve dramatically . . .

Podcast: Rude on the River, Front Ended and the Golden Rule — S3-Ep8

Just like the previous episode, this podcast deals with space on the river. But this time, it’s not about finding space as much as how we share it. Sometimes, we’re forced to share more than we’d like. Other times, there’s simply no question that another angler has broken the code. And how do we deal with that? This is our topic.

Save the Discovery

I’d decided already. I only wanted to know what was possible. Tell me of the fish and no more. I earnestly wanted to track down the rest for myself — whatever the cost — wherever the adventure . . .

The Weights | Drop Shot Nymphing on a Tight Line Rig — Pt.3

The weight is at the heart of drop shot nymphing. Putting that weight at the end of the line is what makes it unique. And using the right kind of weight makes it pretty special.

You want streamlined? You want dense, concentrated weight in a package with no material resistance? You want pure efficiency in a weight form? Drop shot is your answer . . .

Podcast: Find Your Water — Find Space — S3-Ep7

If you want space, if you want to find your own water, it’s there for you. Be an explorer. Fish offbeat times and offbeat locations. Fish bad weather and rough conditions. Find your water, and find space.

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THIS IS TROUTBITTEN

We are passionate and ambitious anglers committed to fishing . . . because we love it. Because it awakens our lives in a way that nothing else ever has, and because fishing is sometimes hard and sometimes it’s easy.

In truth, we fish because we have to. Because, without cold water flowing around us for some time, our spirit dries up a bit. And while standing in a river facing upstream, the water moves through and restores us. It fills us. It mends us. And then it washes away all of those things that just need to be washed away once in a while.

Because working around a stream bend to which we’ve delivered a thousand casts a dozen times before forges a connection with our own past, creating vivid recall of partners who’ve shared the same water which no photograph can ever reproduce. Because we have memories deeper and richer with more emotion when our hands are wet and our legs are weak from hours spent hiking a water-filled path against the current. Our best friends are all fishermen. This is Troutbitten.

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