ARTICLES

Enjoy the Day

TROUTBITTEN

Troutbitten is built on words. These ideas, these stories, tips and tactics are the roots of a tree that has grown branches.

Troutbitten reads more like a book than a blog. So settle in and find something to read.

Find the category links at the top of every article and the tags at the bottom, because those lead to the archive pages for the topic.

Also within these articles, all text in orange leads to supporting content. Finally, use the search page to find what interests you most.

Thank you for your support through the years.

 

ALL ARTICLES

The Good Wader

The Good Wader

The good wader keeps moving, believes in traction, casts in rhythm and makes no excuses. The good wader becomes the good angler . . .

Simplicity and Fishing

Simplicity and Fishing

. . .The fact is, keeping it simple only works when trout agree to your narrow terms.

. . . All those adjustments sounds complicated, right? What happened to simple? Well, it didn’t work so well. And it might actually be simpler (or at least more efficient) to make a few leader adjustments than to fight with dragging dry flies and short drifts all afternoon.

STORIES

Light Dry Dropper in the Flow

Light Dry Dropper in the Flow

. . .The flow of the fly line through the air is finesse and freedom. Contrasted with nymphing, streamer fishing, or any other method that adds weight to the system, casting the weightless dry fly with a fly line is poetry.

The cast is unaffected because the small soft hackle on a twelve-inch tether simply isn’t heavy enough to steal any provided slack from the dry. It’s an elegant addition that keeps the art of dry fly fishing intact . . .

We Wade

We Wade

We wade for contemplation, for strength and exhaustion, for the challenge and the risk. We wade for opportunity . . .

Eat a Trout Once in a While

Eat a Trout Once in a While

I stood next to him on the bank, and I watched my uncle kneel in the cold riffle. Water nearly crested the tops of his hip waders while he adjusted and settled next to the flat sandstone rock that lay between us. He pulled out the Case pocket knife again, as he’d done every other time that I’d watched this fascinating process as a young boy.

“Hand me the biggest one,” my uncle said, with his arm outstretched and his palm up.

So I looked deep into my thick canvas creel for the first trout I’d caught that morning. Five trout lay in the damp creel. I’d rapped each of them on the skull after beaching them on the bank, right between the eyes, just as I’d been taught — putting a clean end to a trout’s life. I handed the rainbow trout to my uncle and smiled with enthusiasm . . .

TACTICS

Fly Cast With Speed — Yes, Always

Fly Cast With Speed — Yes, Always

All fly types — all rigs — need speed to reach their potential. Cast with acceleration and good crisp loops. Do it with dry flies, nymphs, indicator rigs and streamers. And don’t let anyone tell you differently . . .

NYMPHING

#8. The Strike: Nine Essential Skills for Tight Line and Euro Nymphing

#8. The Strike: Nine Essential Skills for Tight Line and Euro Nymphing

The strike is the best part of fishing. It’s what we’re all out there waiting for, or rather, what we’re trying to make happen all day long. And the trout eats because we get so many things right.

We fool a fish, and we fulfill the wish of every angler.

When the fish strikes, we strike back. Short, swift and effective, the hook finds fish flesh. Then we try to keep the trout buttoned and get it to the net.

In the next article, this series concludes with the focus on putting it all together . . .

The Backing Barrel Might Be The Best Sighter Ever

The Backing Barrel Might Be The Best Sighter Ever

A simple piece of Dacron, tied in a barrel, is a visible and sensitive addition to your tight line and euro nymphing rig. The versatile Backing Barrel serves as a stand-alone sighter, especially when tied with a one-inch tag. Better yet, it draws your eyes to the colored monofilament of any sighter and enhances visibility threefold. The Backing Barrel adds a third dimension of strike detection, with the Dacron flag just stiff enough to stand away from the line, but just soft enough to twitch upon even the most subtle takes . . .

#7. Guiding the Flies: Nine Essential Skills for Tight Line and Euro Nymphing

#7. Guiding the Flies: Nine Essential Skills for Tight Line and Euro Nymphing

We overweight to lead the flies, and we underweight to track them. But to guide the flies, we must find the middle ground, with enough weight to control the flies against the effects of the current but not so much that the flies cannot be permitted to drift at the will of that same current.

This may sound like a bit of hocus pocus. But in truth, it’s an intuitive process that becomes natural with trial and error . . .

STREAMERS

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.

ANGLER TYPES IN PROFILE

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.

BIG TROUT

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.

NIGHT FISHING

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.

MORE

With over 900 articles on Troubitten, there’s much more to explore than what you see above.

Use the site menu to navigate through articles collected in series. Click the categories and tags to find the archives pages for each topic.

Everything in orange, sitewide, is a link to more supporting content.

And use the search page to find what you’re looking for.

Also Subscribe to Troutbitten and follow along. (Yes, it’s free.)

Cheers, friends.

 

 

Pin It on Pinterest