The Corner Cast — Rounding the Corner Might Be Better Than a Roll Cast (with VIDEO)

by | Oct 12, 2023 | 6 comments

Casting matters most. Accuracy of delivery, of where the fly lands and how the leader finishes, is the key to effective presentations and efficiency on the water. Hitting targets means we confidently cover the river. Less false casting means more drifting, more stripping and more catching.

With time on the water and attention to detail, anglers find the casts and the techniques to catch trout. But it takes time, and learning a few tricks along the way certainly helps shorten the learning curve. Here’s one of those tricks. I call it the Corner Cast, and I’m surprised how many experienced fly fishers stare in wonder at this one.

The Corner Cast changes the direction of delivery up to ninety degrees from the plane of the back cast. While the standard delivery of a fly cast has the fly landing one-hundred-and-eighty degrees in a straight line from where the back cast turned over, the Corner Cast allows an angler to round the bend ninety degrees from the direction of the back cast.

What some call the change of direction cast is similar, but it’s most often shown with a repositioning of the line then a roll cast. Instead, what I call the Corner Cast uses the powerful momentum of a line and leader in motion to round the bend by simply altering the travel of the rod tip.

I use the Corner Cast every day. It’s a natural cast, easy to learn and delivers big results.

This one definitely needs the video to help understand it. So check it out below . . .

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Do It

Rounding the corner with a Corner Cast often outperforms a Roll Cast. It’s faster, more efficient and easier. But remember, it requires great casting form, with good line speed and crisp stops. That’s where good fly casting always begins. So develop a good baseline and everything else will follow.

Work the Corner Cast into your game. Have it at the ready, and you won’t even think about it. The Corner Cast is really that easy.

Fish hard, friends.

READ: Troutbitten | Category | Fly Casting

 

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Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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6 Comments

  1. Thank you for yet another excellent tip!
    With “constant tension”, the line goes where the rod tip goes.
    Simple, elegant and eminently practical.

    Reply
  2. Another great tip Dom! What are those shiny boxes attached to you top vest pockets?

    Reply
  3. Excellent tips as always Dom! I especially liked how you took the time at the end to differentiate between Corner-Casting fly line versus the standard mono-rig versus the thin/micro mono-rigs. I would’ve been out there flailing one day wondering what I was doing wrong!
    Heading out next week for a full week on the water…gonna give this a try then. Take care brother!

    Reply
  4. I fish some pretty “bushy” streams so this cast will be extremely useful. I also liked the warning about using this cast with the mono rig. Great tips as always!!

    Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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