Search Month: October 2022

Podcast: Catch and Release: Always or Sometimes? And How C&R Changes Things — S5, Ep5

Is catch and release a good idea all the time or just some of the time? In this episode, we consider the ways that the practice of catch and release changes the experience of fishing for us — how our approach shifts when the goals are different.

Streamer Presentations — The Speed Lead

The speed lead is a great look for hungry trout. It keeps the streamer low and in the strike zone, right where trout live, and it shows them an available meal . . .

Fly Cast With Speed — Yes, Always

All fly types — all rigs — need speed to reach their potential. Cast with acceleration and good crisp loops. Do it with dry flies, nymphs, indicator rigs and streamers. And don’t let anyone tell you differently . . .

Podcast: Weight In Fly Fishing: Beads, Shot, Sinking Lines and More — S5, Ep4

Weight is weight. It’s the original sin of fly fishing, and there is nothing inherently better about any of these styles. Use all of them.

Podcast: The Spooky Trout  — What Scares Fish and How to Avoid Spooking Them — S5, Ep3

Podcast: The Spooky Trout — What Scares Fish and How to Avoid Spooking Them — S5, Ep3

Success on the water starts with finding fish and not spooking them. No one ever caught a scared trout. All the tactics, the flies and the habits of river trout that we focus on mean nothing if the fish are on high alert and out of the mood to eat.

Don’t spook the fish. Achieving that is different from season to season. It’s different in various water types. And acceptable distances from the trout change even with the angles by which you approach them . . .

The Inefficiency of Inexperience

The Inefficiency of Inexperience

The way you move on the water, the way you carry gear and how you adapt, has a big impact on your experience out there. Yes, we all enjoy the scenery and solitude. We love the sites and sounds of a river. But when that novelty dulls a bit, the process of solving problems and seeing the results of our solutions is what keeps us in the game for a lifetime . . .

Tight Line and Euro Nymphing: Let It Drop and Then Help It Drift

Tight Line and Euro Nymphing: Let It Drop and Then Help It Drift

We’ve let the fly drop on a free fall, now we help it drift by leading it. Stop its progress downward (don’t let it drop anymore), and guide it downstream. Help it drift.

Remember two things that a nymph should do when it hits the water, and separate them into two actions with your fly rod. Let it drop and then help it drift. That’s great fishing . . .

Podcast: Fly Tying and the Complete Angler — S5, Ep2

Podcast: Fly Tying and the Complete Angler — S5, Ep2

This episode of the Troutbitten Podcast is about tying flies. It’s about how that aspect of fly fishing changes everything for us. Most of us wish to be a complete angler — one who is well rounded, ready for anything and versatile.

By tying flies, we get closer to that goal, because tying flies engages us in a deeper way. We’re more connected, more invested in what we tie to the end of the line. With a few turns of monofilament through the hook eye, we are attached to our own creations and our own solutions . . .

Fly Fishing Tips: The Order of Everything

Fly Fishing Tips: The Order of Everything

A lot goes into a good fishing trip. It’s a flexible framework of pieces and parts mixed in with a little fortuitous intuition. That first trout to the net is rarely luck. And when you start to lose count of how many fish have come to hand, you can be sure that luck has had very little to do with it.

We like to dig into the details of fly fishing. How fast should we lead a pair of nymphs on a tight line? What streamer-head-angle produces best for a medium retrieve in flat water? But the overarching principles of how to catch a trout — the headers of the outline — are these . . .

Podcast: Fly Fishing Through the Fall Season — S5, Ep1

Podcast: Fly Fishing Through the Fall Season — S5, Ep1

Fall fishing offers renewed hope and opening opportunities, along with a change of scenery. As the foliage turns, so do the habits of wild trout. Our favorite fish loses some of its characteristic inhibitions.

More water, less light and the instinct to fatten up create unique opportunities for every angler who is willing to meet the trout on their own terms. While hatches may be sparse, the underwater game opens up to those with the skills to present a nymph, streamer or wet fly with precision . . .

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