Podcast: Fly Fishing Through the Fall Season — S5, Ep1

by | Oct 2, 2022 | 2 comments

 The Troutbitten Podcast is available everywhere that you listen to your podcasts.

** Note **  The Podcast Player, along with links to your favorite players is below.

The Troutbitten Podcast is back for season five. My full crew of friends returns, joining me for some great conversations about fly fishing for river trout. We’ll tackle a little bit of everything this season — with streamers, nymphs, wets and dry flies. And while there will be plenty of tactics talk, I’m sure we’ll get into some good stories and experiences on the river too.

Episode one kicks this season off with a discussion about fly fishing through the fall season, from the late summer turn of the equinox, heading into the beginning of fall, to the end of the spawning season, which around here signals the beginning of winter.

Fall fishing offers renewed hope and opening opportunities, along with a change of scenery. As the foliage turns, so do the habits of wild trout. Our favorite fish loses some of its characteristic inhibitions.

More water, less light and the instinct to fatten up create unique opportunities for every angler who is willing to meet the trout on their own terms. While hatches may be sparse, the underwater game opens up to those with the skills to present a nymph, streamer or wet fly with precision.

Trout chase. They migrate. They feed and they procreate. Fall fishing offers a style of fishing that is unequaled in any other season.

We Cover the Following
  • What we look forward to most in the fall
  • Do trout feed more throughout the fall season?
  • How fewer hatches affect fish behavior and fishing opportunities
  • More or less water. What is our preference?
  • The leaf hatch
  • How does spawning affect the fishing?
  • When does fall fishing turn into winter?
  • Favorite fall tactics
Resources

READ: Troutbitten | Full Days of Early Fall
READ: Troutbitten | Category | Streamers 
READ: Troutbitten | Category | Nymphing

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Next Time

Season Five of the Troubitten Podcast continues next week with episode two. So look for that one in your Troutbitten Podcast feed.

Fish hard, friends.

 

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Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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2 Comments

  1. I live in West Yellowstone, and have had one of the best fishing seasons ever in the Park. Lots of bugs and not many people, but in the north end of the Park, it’s like exploring all new rivers. For example the Lamar is completely different. There is hardly a rock that hasn’t been moved downstream. It can make access to the river quite difficult, and I’ve seen side walls collapse while I’m fishing, but the fish have been hungry. The Yellowstone itself has been fantastic — large cutthroats all summer long and all day long. Can’t complain, and am currently enjoying Fall fishing before the Park closes. Life is good.

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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