Podcast: Three Styles of Dry Dropper — Dry Dropper Skills Series #1

by | Aug 14, 2022 | 1 comment

 The Troutbitten Podcast is available everywhere that you listen to your podcasts.

** Note **  The Podcast Player, along with links to your favorite players is below.

With season four of the Troutbitten Podcast, we’re back to the Skills Series format, with tightly packed, tactical episodes that cover one topic in depth. This season, we’re digging into the three styles of dry dropper.

This first episodes is an overview of the three styles, along with a good discussion about why and when  we enjoy fishing dry dropper in the first place.

Dry dropper sounds like a great idea. Just add nymph below a dry fly and catch fish on both offerings, right? But it’s not that easy. And there are some real consequences. I argue that it’s impossible to fish both flies perfectly, so by recognizing three distinctly different styles of rigging and fishing dry dropper, we make choices — what fly will we prioritize and how will we get great drifts?

In 2019, I published a full series on these Three Styles of Dry Dropper on the Troutbitten Website. You can find them here:

READ: Troutbitten | Three Styles of Dry Dropper
READ: Troutbitten | Three Styles of Dry Dropper — Light Dry Dropper
READ: Troutbitten | Three Styles of Dry Dropper — Standard Dry Dropper
READ: Troutbitten | Three Styles of Dry Dropper — Tight Line Dry Dropper

Now, with this Skills Series on the Troutbitten Podcast, my friend, Austin Dando, joins me for a deep dive beyond the framework of these styles. This podcast series is an excellent companion for the article series.

Because “fishing dry dropper” can really mean a lot of things. And each of these styles has many moments when it’s the clear winner.

So, the next time someone talks about dry dropper fishing, ask them what style — because there’s a lot of room for variety.

Here’s the podcast  . . .

Listen with the player above, or . . .

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. . . and everywhere else where you listen to podcasts.

You can find the dedicated Troutbitten Podcast page at . . .

podcast.troutbitten.com

 

Episode Two of Season Four continues this skills series education with the focus on Light Dry Dropper. So look for that one in your Troutbitten Podcast feed.

Fish hard, friends.

 

** Donate ** If you enjoy this podcast, please consider a donation. Your support is what keeps this Troutbitten project funded. Scroll below to find the Donate Button. And thank you.

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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1 Comment

  1. I love the work you guys are doing with the Troutbitten project. I’m looking forward to the rest of the series. I wrote a post about a month ago after spending a summer day on a Maryland tailwater.

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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