Podcast Ep 13: Big Trout From Pennsylvania to Montana — With Guest, Matt Grobe

by | Dec 14, 2021 | 3 comments

 The Troutbitten Podcast, Episode 13, is now available everywhere that you listen to your podcasts.

** Note **  The Podcast Player, along with links to your favorite players is below.

In this episode, I get together with my long time friend, Matt Grobe, for a candid, entertaining, fun and technical discussion about wild trout, big trout, and the differences between the fishing cultures and opportunities available in two of the meccas for trout fishing in the states — Pennsylvania and Montana.

Matt has lived and fished hard in both states, and he’s been fortunate enough to live a life on the water, not just chasing wild trout, but chasing the big ones. He’s always had a knack for turning over the next top tier fish. And in our conversation, Matt offers some great tips for targeting big trout and consistently putting them in the net.

Matt Grobe is one of the best fishermen that I know. He’s honest and realistic. He values wild trout, and he hates the shortcut. Matt doesn’t fish setups. He earns every trout because he appreciates the experience — the fair chase for wild trout in wild places. He’s a technician on the water, but he’s not competitive. He’s generous but secretive in all the best ways. Matt searches for answers out there, and trout fishing has been part of his life for a long, long time. Matt’s one of my favorite people that I’ve ever shared the water with, and I wish he still lived in Pennsylvania.

We Cover the Following
  • The Crossover Technique
  • The origins of naming two foot trout — yes, Matt started this nonsense
  • Key differences between PA and MT
  • Why Matt focuses on big trout
  • Why does the quality or the origins of big trout matter?
  • Wild vs stocked in PA
  • Do thirty inch trout exist without a setup?
  • Do you need streamers for big trout?
  • Where to target big trout most often
  • Matt’s windy bugger technique

 

Listen with the player above, or . . .

Find the Troutbitten podcast on any of these services:

— Apple Podcasts
— Spotify
— Google Podcasts
— Amazon Music
. . . and everywhere else where you listen to podcasts.

Resources

READ: Troutbitten | From Pennsylvania to Montana and Back
READ: Troutbitten |  Streamer Presentations — Crossover Technique
READ: Troutbitten | Category | The Mono Rig
READ: Troutbitten | Modern Streamers: Too Much Motion? Are We Moving Them Too Fast ?

 

You can find the dedicated Troutbitten Podcast page at . . .

podcast.troutbitten.com

 

Thank You!

The Troutbitten Podcast continues to grow quickly. I sincerely appreciate the support. Your downloads, subscriptions to the podcast and five star reviews are the key metrics in the podcast world. These kinds of stats help garner financial support from the industry and keep these podcasts coming. So thank you for being part of it all.

Fish hard, friends.

 

** Donate ** If you enjoy this podcast, please consider a donation. Your support is what keeps this Troutbitten project funded. Scroll below to find the Donate Button. And thank you.

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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3 Comments

  1. Really enjoyed this podcast.I’m beginning to see a common thread in the friends you keep and that’s their passion for trout fishing thanks to you and them for sharing,I always go fishing for the next three days after I read or listen now to your pods. Also I’ve becomes intrigued about your unspoken fly. I would never ask ,but I’m putting together clues which I’ll also keep to myself I think I know what kind of fly it is,but maybe it’s like the 30inch trout Im probably way off
    oh well some things should be our secrets.Thanks Dom for the instruction and entertainment. Pete

    Reply
  2. 59 yrs young & I finally made it to Montana this past Summer.
    16 days of fishing, camping, & hanging out with like minded people–what a wonderful trip. We wet waded many streams & rivers and caught trout in all; including a Whiskey within YNP.
    Your podcast tied everything together–PA early Spring with bugs Poppin & MT Hoppers & Dries—I have experienced Nirvana.
    And yes, PA anglers are everywhere—6 miles into the backcountry and we run into 2 other anglers, both from PA. Go Figure…
    Rep Your Water,
    Scott W
    PA Angler

    Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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