Levels, Resets and New Beginnings

by | Mar 24, 2021 | 4 comments

I feel fortunate that I grew up fishing small streams. I learned to read trout water on wooded creeks that roughly paralleled dirt roads or meandered away from them. Access was more often at a dusty pull-off rather than a paved lot.

But these weren’t tiny brooks either. Some waters were fifty or a hundred feet wide in places. However, the streams of my youth all shared a key feature — they had character. They were high-gradient waters that had river-bends, islands and undercuts mixed in, enough to offer endless new beginnings, simply by walking upstream. And for a new angler — for any angler — the chance to reset the table, to start anew in fresh water over undisturbed trout, was priceless.

Levels

These natural breaks in the river are what I call level changes. And there’s a chance for a new beginning, anywhere the rocks of the riverbed create a separation between one section and the next.

Imagine where the tailout of a pool meets the riffle before the next downstream run. The lip is the level change. So as you work upstream through the run and into the riffle, you eye the tailout as an entirely new level than the one you are standing in.

While fishing pocket water around a long bend of three-hundred yards, there may be countless level changes. Pocket water is perfect for offering new opportunities at every rock. But even within those hundreds of yards, there are clear breaking points that separate one level from the next.

READ: Troutbitten | Pocket and the V

Photo by Josh Darling

These levels are nothing more than a section of river to fish, and the divider usually runs from bank to bank.

Experience teaches us that fish can be easily disturbed as we work these sections. Catching one trout often alerts the others. A hooked fish that jumps and splashes among a group of risers can put those feeding fish down for some time — maybe for good. Likewise, wading through a level pushes trout away from us. And in the wrong situation, their fleeting forms seem to alert every other trout to imminent danger — like Paul Revere yelling that the fishermen are coming.

But in the next level upstream, trout are entirely undisturbed. Just wade a few yards, and a new game begins. This is the wonderful thing about small and medium sized rivers — the levels are short and plentiful.

The Big Stuff

Many anglers admit that large rivers are intimidating. And they are. For me, big waters were a locked door for many seasons. And I still require some stern mental discipline to keep me in line and fish big waters the right way.

Large expanses of river are best broken down into smaller sections that we can fish effectively. Put aside any notion that the best trout must be against the far bank — because you cannot reach it with a decent cast. Instead, target only the water that you can fish well.

That’s good advice. But it doesn’t fully acknowledge the challenge. Big water just doesn’t have as many level breaks. So the chances to reset and start fresh are far less frequent.

The Advantage

On my home waters, I might fish twenty different levels in just a few hours of fishing. And at each level, the table is reset. The Etch A Sketch is shaken and my mistakes are cleared. Then again, on the big waters that I frequent, I might fish one or two levels in a full morning of fishing.

That’s not to say that big waters don’t have their chances to reach fresh, undisturbed trout. Of course they do. There are structures and natural breaks like rock shelves, gravel bars, boulder lines and more. But none of these are as distinct — as delineating — as a good level change.

This frequent chance for a purely new beginning is one of the joys of small to medium sized rivers. It keeps us hopeful. Forgiveness comes at the next level — across the next lip. This is the time for a deep breath and renewed determination. Because in the next level, over fresh trout that are unwise to our presence, all of our plans will come together. This we believe.

Photo by Josh Darling

The fisherman is eternally hopeful. Levels and resets are the perfect opportunity to strengthen that hope.

Fish hard, friends.

 

** Donate ** If you enjoy this article, please consider a donation. Your support is what keeps this Troutbitten project funded. Scroll below to find the Donate Button. And thank you.

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

Share This Article . . .

Since 2014 and 700+ articles deep
Troutbitten is a free resource for all anglers.
Your support is greatly appreciated.

– Explore These Post Tags –

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

More from this Category

Tight Line Nymph Rig

Tight Line Nymph Rig

Almost eight years ago, I made some adaptations to my nymph rig that completely changed the game for me, tripling my catch rate and adding a new spark to my passion for fly fishing. Suddenly, a whole new set of techniques and achievements were possible on the water,...

Night Shift – Into the Dark

Night Shift – Into the Dark

You can't stand up to the night until you understand what's hiding in its shadows.  -- Charles De Lint Last June I made a commitment. I promised myself that I would go deep into the night game and learn to catch the wildest trout in the darkest hours. Having spent a...

Efficiency: Part 2 – Leader/Tippet Changes

Efficiency: Part 2 – Leader/Tippet Changes

  My best days on the water are usually full of changes. The morning fog burns off, and I switch from streamers to nymphs; a half hour later, a swirling back eddy looks like the home of the next nameable brown trout (two footer), and I go back to...

Efficiency: Part 1 – Knots

Efficiency: Part 1 – Knots

"You can't catch a fish without your fly in the water." Efficiency has become a game for me; it's something I enjoy; it's something I think about when I'm not fishing, and I'm constantly trying to improve on a system that keeps my flies in the water and the downtime...

DIY – Bar Boots

DIY – Bar Boots

I burn through boot soles fast. And cheap boots with poor foot support are a bad idea when you're wading heavy runs and putting full days on the water with lots of hiking, so I was spending about $150 every ten months on a new pair of boots. I used to resole my own...

A Better Streamer Box

A Better Streamer Box

After many years of carrying a select group of my favorite streamers in a fairly small box, I now find myself in an experimental phase with the big bugs again.  I'm generally in the camp that believes presentation is far more important than pattern, but trying new...

What do you think?

Be part of the Troutbitten community of ideas.
Be helpful. And be nice.

4 Comments

  1. “like Paul Revere yelling that the fishermen are coming.” I just love this – this is the phrase I needed when teaching my children to fish. It is the phrase I wanted but couldn’t pull to think or say to the guy downstream of me who crossed the boundary into my zone and my “Level” of the river…Hey Paul. I have now been equipped for others but mostly for the goofball in the mirror that is a slow learner about such things. Hey Paul… they could be your fish if you take more mindful care.

    Reply
  2. Love it.
    It’s all about hope.
    And it’s funny, I spend a lot of time staring out at the ocean. It feels infinite.
    But a trout stream, even though I can see bank to bank, feels infinite while working upstream.

    Reply
  3. Dom – do you happen to know what type of bag the Angler was wearing in the lead photo of your Resets and New Beginnings article. Thanks Eddie

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recent Articles

Recent Posts

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

Pin It on Pinterest