Troutbitten on Dave Stewart’s Wet Fly Swing Podcast

by | Jun 5, 2020 | 2 comments

I had a great conversation with Dave Stewart on his Wet Fly Swing podcast. We talked about streamers, nymphs, the Mono Rig and how Troutbitten has grown into a fly fishing company and become my full time career.

You can find the pod on Spotify, iTunes or wherever you listen to your podcasts. Just search for “Wet Fly Swing” in your app.

You can also stream it, download or share it from the following link:

Wet Fly Swing #140 — Domenick Swentosky 

Dave is a fantastic host who digs deep and gets a lot from his guests. Through the years, I’ve particularly enjoyed his interviews, with John Gierach, Kelly Galloup and Joe Humphreys. So, dig back through the archives of the Wet Fly Swing to find interviews with those guests and many more.

Fish hard friends.

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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2 Comments

  1. Great work, Dom. You’re now officially a media sensation, a piscatorial influencer.

    Alex

    Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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