Fifty Fly Fishing Tips: #40 — The Trout is Upstream of the Rise

by | Apr 29, 2018 | 0 comments

Anglers love to talk about trout rise forms. There’s the subtle sip and the tail tip, the splashy swirl and the sideways swipe. Surely, all the various ways trout rise to the surface indicates something about what they’re actually feeding on. But regardless of the rise form, one primary rule (usually) applies: The trout is holding upstream of where it rises.

Let’s imagine a trout holding in two feet of water with a medium current — a speed that matches a comfortable and casual walking pace. The trout lies on the bottom, with its nose in the flow, watching for available food drifting downstream toward it. Perhaps the trout is keying on Sulfur mayfly duns, and it’s rising confidently to most of the half-inch, yellowish insects that drift into view of its seam.

Here comes the next dun . . .

As a mayfly approaches, the trout tilts its head and body upward, allowing the current to push against its belly and lift the trout to the surface. It takes our trout two seconds to travel upward and reach the surface. And within those two seconds, the trout drifts downstream, let’s say three feet.

The trout eats the mayfly dun, and we see the rise.

Next, the trout angles its head and body downward, allowing the current to push against its back, returning the trout to the bottom of the river. With a flick of the tail, our trout returns three feet upstream to its original position where it scans for the next mayfly dun.

Importantly, there’s not a lot of swimming going on here. Our trout does not propel itself upstream to capture the fly.

Trout are amazingly efficient because they have to be. They cannot expend more energy capturing the mayfly than the calories they gain by eating it. So they let the current do the work.

Watching a trout feed during a hatch, watching the way it moves and flows with  the currents (as if part of the water itself) is remarkably and economically beautiful.

Sure, trout also swim and chase after surface bugs. And sometimes they travel far outside their lane to capture a meal. But those moments are an exception to the rule. More often, we find trout holding a position and waiting for food to come within range. The trout works with the current, ultimately taking the fly downstream of its original position.

With cooperative light conditions and enough patience, you can stand bank side and watch this happen over and over.

And here comes the next rise . . .

Visually mark the rise. But understand, the surface circle of the rise is not our primary target. Our trout is holding on the bottom of the river, three feet upstream of the rise form. And it’s looking upstream, scanning the drift for its next meal. The place to cast, then, is six or ten feet upstream of the rise form and in the same seam.

Get everything just right, and with a dash of good luck, your fly becomes the trout’s next target.

It’s all variable

Rules like these come with a caveat — it’s fishing; it’s a river and these are trout, so anything can and will change.

Sometimes trout hold right under the surface. Or during emergences of larger insects, trout may expand their range and track down a bigger meal. Likewise, quickly emerging caddis may inspire trout to give chase and swim and little more.

Nothing is constant, but some things on a trout stream are predictable within a reasonable range. And it’s fair to assume that most rising trout are actually positioned a bit ahead of the surface rise form.

It’s a good starting point, anyway.

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

 

Share This Article . . .

Since 2014 and 700+ articles deep
Troutbitten is a free resource for all anglers.
Your support is greatly appreciated.

– Explore These Post Tags –

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

More from this Category

Fifty Fly Fishing Tips: #10 — Mend Less

Fifty Fly Fishing Tips: #10 — Mend Less

Many fly anglers are entertained and enamored with the fly line itself. They make loops and curls that hang and fall, watching the line swing and glide through the air. Drawing those shapes and curves is artistic, but it doesn’t do much for good fishing. More than one...

Fifty Fly Fishing Tips: #8 — Use the Davy Knot — Here’s why

Fifty Fly Fishing Tips: #8 — Use the Davy Knot — Here’s why

I hesitate to include the Davy Knot as a tip in this series. There are a bunch of good fishing knots out there. They all work. Everyone has their favorite, and no one wants to be told what to do.

So I won’t tell you to change to the Davy Knot. I’ll just show you why I use it and why I switched to the Davy after I first saw it tied.

I use the Davy Knot because it’s super quick to tie, it wastes no material, and it has a small profile that allows for more movement of the fly . . .

Fifty Fly Fishing Tips: #7 — Choose lots of fish, or choose big fish — You can’t have both

Fifty Fly Fishing Tips: #7 — Choose lots of fish, or choose big fish — You can’t have both

I’ve often said that my best strategy for catching a big brown trout is to fool a bunch of trout, and one of them will be big. But I don’t believe that so completely anymore.

Let me say, right up front, that I have some friends who seem to accomplish high numbers and big fish in the same day all too often. My buddy, Matt Grobe, kinda tears it up out in Montana. But Matt’s always been a lucky bastard, so let’s just leave it at that.

In all honesty, Matt agrees with the premise that you can’t have both. I just checked. He said yes. So we have his blessing here to continue.

In the last five years I’ve shared the water with Burke a lot too, and I’ve learned some strategies about big fish fishing.

There are some truths, some guiding principles for targeting larger trout, and the list starts like this: #1: Stop trying to catch a bunch of fish . . .

What do you think?

Be part of the Troutbitten community of ideas.
Be helpful. And be nice.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Recent Articles

Recent Posts

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

Pin It on Pinterest