Where is My Fly?

by | Mar 28, 2018 | 0 comments

Hatch Magazine published my article, “Where is my fly?”

Being unaware of the fly’s position holds us back from making effective drifts. That awareness starts with good casting and fly placement — you need to see the fly hit the water. After that, it takes some education and a lot of imagination.

Some thoughts and some solutions for seeing and tracking dries, nymphs, wets and streamers are in the article.

Excerpts . . .

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. . . Ultimately, good fly fishing is about good strike detection. And if we can’t track the flies, we can’t track the eats.

. . . It comes down to hoping vs controlling the outcome. Without a solid awareness of your fly’s position, you’re just hoping to catch a fish. With it, you’re in control of the outcome. Fish on.

. . . Tracking dry flies on the surface is a cinch compared to the mental gymnastics required to visualize what’s going on with your flies under the water. But with the right tools and a little experience, it becomes intuitive.

— — — — — — — — — —

Read the full article over at Hatch Magazine.

 

Enjoy the day
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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