Fifty Fly Fishing Tips: #29 — Read Trout Water

by | Feb 11, 2018 | 5 comments

Gravity pulls it downstream. All of it. Every drop of water merging into a river, whether fallen directly from the clouds into a small brook, or bubbling from a spring seep on a large and open river, is under the consistent influence of a force none of us can see. But we feel it. It’s predictable. Gravity holds few surprises. And though its mystery runs deep, we’ve each learned, from birth, to expect the unseen force holding our world together to continue doing just that — to keep all the pieces and parts stuck tight — trusting that the center will hold and things won’t fall apart. It’s consistent enough to be boring. But as an angler, the effects of gravity on flowing water is fascinating. It’s fundamental. And it’s the key to reading trout water.

Pulled along by gravity, water follows the path of least resistance downstream until it ends up in an ocean (usually). This is a fun concept to explain to my young boys, how the tiny brook in the backyard merges with Spring Creek in Bellefonte, into the next river, on down into the West Branch of the Susky, then the Susquehanna, and out to the Chesapeake Bay.

“Noooo waaaay!” Aiden says, when I show him this course on a map. He’s old enough to have gained some perspective on distance now. He knows how many hours it takes to travel halfway across the state to Grandpa’s house. And now, as we roll down the highway, he watches for drainage ditches and bridges large and small.

“That water was in our backyard,” he says, as we cross a bridge on I-80.

“That’s right, bud!” I tell him. “More or less,” I whisper under my breath.

If you’ve never thought about all this, or if you’re a new angler who didn’t grow up playing in a small runoff stream (building rock dams and intuitively learning hydraulic flows) then it’s probably time to consider what makes a river run downstream — because you can be sure that the trout know all about it.

I’ve studied a bunch of books about reading rivers, and Dave Hughes’ 2010 work, Reading the Water is my favorite. Hughes breaks down every nuance of moving water and how it relates to trout, in 312 pages of detail. I’m not foolish enough to attempt anything like that in this short tip of fifty. Instead, I’ll merely suggest that reading the water and finding willing trout starts with understanding how the river flows.

Water flows faster where the gradient is steeper. Sure, that’s easy to see when comparing a riffle with its neighboring pool, but it’s less obvious within that riffle. Finding the edge of a current break, or seeing a submerged log stuck in the riverbed, leads you to the places where trout live. We know that trout look for structure, but perhaps it’s more helpful to expect trout at certain features.

READ: Troutbitten | Where to find Big Trout: Part Three — The Special Buckets

The undercut bank is obvious, but the unseen, minor shelf, just eight feet long and ten inches deep, is harder to find. Gravity, though, gives it away. And learning to read trout water starts with identifying and understanding surface currents. When water flows faster and deeper into a pocket created by that ten-inch shelf, you can see its effect on the surface. And that’s the key.

Large, seemingly featureless waters are never truly that — every river has features to be found and surface currents that give away the structure of the streambed.

Photo by Bill Dell

Learning to read water is easier on a small stream. Find a river with lots of rocks, wood, hard bends and gradient shifts. Notice what those features do to the flow, how the surface currents are affected, along with the base current. Then take that knowledge over to the large “featureless” stretches of river, and it’ll be clearer to you where trout may live.

So what?

All of this is important because trout don’t hold in every water type. And wherever they’re holding they’re not always feeding. A certain percentage of the river is unproductive, and of course, that varies with different seasons and conditions.

READ: Fifty Fly Fishing Tips: #22 — Find Feeding Fish

Watch for the main flow. In every piece of water, determine the primary stem of current running downstream, then pick out the side flows. See how they have their own branches that diverge and later merge again. Focus on those points of diversion and convergence, and you’ll often find a trout or two.

Fly fishing, at it’s best, is about teaching yourself. More accurately, it’s about giving yourself a chance to learn these things. So fill your head with ideas, and then go out to the river to explore them. Grow that knowledge into something you can build upon, something that eventually feels familiar and natural. And then get after it.

Fish hard, friends.

 

Enjoy the day
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

 

 

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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5 Comments

  1. Its a great helpful article for all. There are many types of Fishing methods. Fly fishing one of them. Different types of fishes catch fish.Different types of fishes catch fish. But not everyone can apply these methods correctly because they do not know much about this issue. The rules shown above are very effective. Which will help to catch a lot more of all fishing lovers and better fishing. I gather more important knowledge about fly fishing.

    Reply
  2. Surface feeders help anglers to reverse engineer the skill of “reading water”. Watch where they are feeding AND note the water type and related structure. Following the foam (bubbles) also helps beginners to read the micro-currents that channel surface food to feeding lanes and lies. Surface currents are the conveyor belts that deliver food to waiting trout, Some of these currents (food conveyors) are extremely small in scale or subtle in motion. The skill of reading water (currents/structure) is as important as the skill of presentation, and once mastered it will establish repeatable patterns of location and feeding.

    Reply
  3. As a beginner (only 2 years under my belt), do trout in a small river hold in different places in different seasons, e.g. compare winter vs spring? I do a lot of winter fishing but I seem to have trouble understanding where the trout will lie.

    Reply
    • Sure, Mike.

      As a VERY general rule, I find trout in slower water in the winter. That does not mean pools. They made hold in pools, but rarely feed very well in pools (my experience). I like the soft seams next to the stuff you would normally fish in average temps.

      Lots more winter stuff here:

      https://troutbitten.com/category/winter-fishing/

      Cheers.
      Dom

      Reply
  4. What a great lesson. I knew how to read the water somewhat as a kayaker/rafter but as a fisherman I never really thought about it in quite the same terms. I can’t wait to get out to any water now (maybe not the Hudson or East River). Thanks again for the great writing.

    Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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