Vote The Little Juniata River as DCNR’s River of the Year

by | Dec 7, 2017 | 0 comments

How often do you get the chance to positively impact the health of your favorite river? Most of us want to help, but conservation takes time. Sure, we pick up trash, release most of our trout and take care of the stream. Many of us also donate time and money, hoping to see our favorite watershed improve as we leave something better than the way we found it. Sometimes, though, our efforts seem small. So here’s a way you can do something big!

Vote for DCNR’s Pennsylvania River of the Year. (Link Removed in 2018)

For the past twenty years, the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) has annually recognized one river as the River of the Year. This recognition is done to raise awareness of the important recreational, ecological, and historical resources associated with the state’s rivers and streams. — DCNR

There are five nominees, and my ballot is no secret. I voted for the Little Juniata River.

I asked my friend, Bill Anderson (president of the Little Juniata River Association) what receiving River of the Year might mean for the Little J. What is the main benefit? Bill told me that the big fat check for $10,000 is a good start! (I paraphrased that.)

Trust me, Bill and the LJRA know how to make the most of those funds. They’ve been improving and protecting the trout fishery of the Little Juniata River for decades.

Voting ends December 22, and to this date, over 5000 votes have been cast.

Here are the nominees. (Link removed in 2018)

Here is the River of the Year home page. (Link removed in 2018)

Here is where you can vote. (Link removed in 2018)

Please share this post with someone else who loves the Little Juniata River.

Enjoy the day
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

Share This Article . . .

Since 2014 and 700+ articles deep
Troutbitten is a free resource for all anglers.
Your support is greatly appreciated.

– Explore These Post Tags –

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

More from this Category

Why Wild Trout Matter

Why Wild Trout Matter

We believe wild trout populations should be protected, wherever they are found. That starts by eliminating the stocking of hatchery trout over good wild trout populations. It continues by finding struggling wild trout populations and helping them — strengthening their numbers by improving water quality and habitat.

Neither state nor private organizations should be permitted to stock over established wild trout populations. 

We believe that wild trout, wherever they are found, should be given a chance.

But Why?

I asked some of my fishing friends why wild trout matter, and I thought their answers would be similar. Surprisingly, they weren’t. Their reasons for loving and caring about wild trout vary significantly in message and tone.

In truth, there are hundreds of reasons why wild trout matter. And my friends gave me impassioned answers. Here are some of their words . . .

Where the Lines Are Drawn

Where the Lines Are Drawn

I’m fascinated by the arbitrary lines people create for themselves. Nowhere in life do I see the tendency to define and delineate so strongly as it’s seen in fishermen. Anglers constantly draw lines about how they fish, about what kind of fisherman they are, and more emphatically, what kind of fisherman they are not . . .

What do you think?

Be part of the Troutbitten community of ideas.
Be helpful. And be nice.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Recent Articles

Recent Posts

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

Pin It on Pinterest