Fifty Tips Tips/Tactics

Fifty Fly Fishing Tips: #16 — You don’t need big flies to catch big fish

on
November 13, 2017
I’ll get right to the point: Your best bet for catching trophy trout is with medium to small flies.

I’ve written about making the choice between going for big fish or for a bunch of fish, arguing that you can’t have both. I’ve also pushed the point on these Troutbitten pages that catching big fish does not require fishing big flies.

Talking with my buddy, Matt Grobe, the other day, he summed it up like this: Fishing large streamers is the most overrated thing out there for catching the big ones. Nice. And this is coming from a guy who fishes the heart of Montana, around Bozeman and beyond, all year round.

I live in the other fly fishing capitol of the U.S., in Central Pennsylvania. And while most of my large trout are caught on smaller patterns, I’ve always figured maybe it’s just a PA thing. We don’t have as many XXL trout as the waters in Michigan, Montana and elsewhere. And while I’ve tried to force big streamers on our fish, my most consistent action comes from smaller flies. The more guides I talk with, the more dirty fishermen I get to know, like Grobe, the more I hear the same thing that I already believed — smaller patterns catch large trout.

Big streamers?

I’ve pushed back on this before, and I’ll do it here again. Fishing big streamers is fun, but it’s not the most consistent way to haul in the river beasts. You can fool the largest trout in the river, more often, with a smaller pattern.

Don’t mistake my point. I know fishing big streamers is fun; I know big patterns catch big fish; and I know that many guys just prefer slinging long, nasty, articulated bugs all day. That’s excellent. Keep doing it. I’m just saying that if someone offers to pay off my mortgage if I catch a big fish today, I know exactly what nymphs I’ll have at the end of my line.

What is small?

Most streamers are too big to be considered small. Even old school streamer patterns tied on #6-8 hooks are not small enough to fit in this class. But there’s some crossover at the tail end of the streamer group — a simple, small Bugger is a great producer. Tie them on #10 or #12 hooks and start with a dead drift.

That leads me to this point: Bigger nymphs are a good idea. I don’t catch a lot of large trout on tiny nymphs. Sure I have, but in most cases, the tiny nymph was accompanied by something bigger too; I often trail tiny nymphs (#18 or #20) behind something larger — like that #12 Bugger.

So the medium to large sized nymph — not a “big” fly by most standards — is the sweet spot for size. Again, flies in the #10-12 range, sometimes #8, are my best producers for large trout. I tie most of these on 2X long hooks So, depending on tail length, the flies may be 1-2 inches long.

Photo by Pat Burke

You have to be good at it, though

All of this is predicated on the idea that you know how to get a dead drift. And if they won’t take a dead drifted fly, then you better know how to activate the fly with the right motion. What’s right? Well that depends, of course — everything in fishing always depends — but giving the fly subtle strips, or using rod twitches mixed in with the dead drift is a great alternative. It’s what I think of a crossover technique — somewhere between streamer fishing and nymphing.

READ: Ask Landon Mayer: One key habit of big trout, and the flies to match

Use both

I’m not suggesting that big streamers don’t have their place. I carry a box of large, articulated patterns every time I’m on the water. It’s just not my go-to tactic for hooking the biggest fish in the river.

I’ve heard a few guys talk about using big streamers to locate large fish, then coming back with nymphs to precisely target the holding lie and hook a monster. So when a good trout charges your streamer and refuses it, rest him for a while — ten minutes or maybe a couple days — and come back with nymphs to settle the score.

I’ve done this a few times. For me, it’s one of those things that I wish worked a little more often, but it’s produced often enough to be a strategy I can believe in. If nothing else, it’s fun to have a certain mission while on the water.

What about dries?

All of the above is about underwater flies — nymphs, streamers, wets. And if you want to target the biggest trout, going underneath is undoubtedly your best option.

But bigger dries attract larger fish too. In my favorite big fish waters, I choose one or two sizes larger for my prospecting sizes. I like #12 Parachute Ants instead of the #14’s and #16’s that I regularly fish. Better yet, I like throwing a #10 or #8 PMX back into the dark, brushy shadows because the larger patterns seem to stir up bigger fish more often . . . unless there’s a hatch, then those rules are off the table.

The biggest trout I’ve ever caught, a 26 inch wild brown, took a #16 Adams. So yes, the wonderful thing about fishing is that anything can happen at any time. And I think we all love that.

But day in and day out, if I really want to target big trout, I’ll fish underneath, and I won’t be fishing large streamers. I’ll fish mid sized nymphs, Buggers or similar, usually dead drifted.

Just remember there’s a time and place for everything.

Photo by Chris Kehres

Enjoy the day
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

FIFTY TIPS

Read All of the Fifty Tips Series
TAGS
RELATED POSTS

4
What do you think?

3 Comment threads
1 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
4 Comment authors
  Follow the comments on this article.  
Notify of

I used to fish a technical river in the southeast and while the name of the game was usually midges or mayflies 18 and smaller, a weighted golden stonefly or cranefly pattern could always pull some nice fish in heavier water.

So fish bigger flies but only sometimes and small flies will catch fish but not all the time. Sometimes fish streamers but use varying sizes then sometimes don’t use streamers at all just nymphs make them big but not all the time many times small nymphs will work just as well. haha Fly fishing is so many times both confusing and contradictory at the same time.

Great article, but only one technical inaccuracy*. Your take on relatively small flies for big fish jives with trophy trout-man, Landon Mayer. His micro-leech (1.5″) is just a close cousin to your larger nymphs. Your recommendations also fit his “abundant and helpless prey” profile to a tee.The really big articulated streamers are not getting eats – they are getting territorial attacks. That’s why the streamer guys count misses more than they count fish landed. Kelly Gallup explains this very clearly. Cover a lot of water, get lots of follows, lots of misses, and an occasional hook up. Domenick, can’t thank… Read more »

Domenick Swentosky
BELLEFONTE, PA

Hi. I'm a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

STICKERS
STICKERS
TAGS
brown trout mousing Mystery carp dry flies Night photography friends rookies Streamer fishing beadhead Sighter mono rig gear stocked trout Dylan catch and release nymphing efficiency Press dog Industry Stuff dead drift Boat BadMoFo mistakes Grandfather DJS dry fly fishing walking wildlife bite windows Tippet Rings giveaway philosophy knots BES tightline Streamers Jeff Fifty Tips Backing Barrel big brown trout fishing with kids Quote DHALO Stockies mud Memories It's just fishing wading club fishing fly box Weather Aiden tiny flies come on man leaders Camping net indicator nymphing backcountry small streams Little Juniata River nymphs night-sighter PSA front ended fly line Gierach flies Ask an Expert winter winter fly fishing Night Fishing Dad nymphing tips Troutbitten Fly Box streamside Wild Mushrooms split shot Presentations Dry-Dropper PA Gold tracks Oakiewear home-stream comp fishing Trust skunked George Harvey winter fishing etiquette Galloup trout bum Bad Mother spot burning marginal water History tight lining big fish public land droppers silence rules Burke PFBC Sawyer boys Pennsylvania Whiskey Drinker tenkara Peace cookout travel fall brush fishing Rich tips stinky bass Discovery Spring Creek summer waders George Daniel dorsey yarn indicator rigs Buggers reading water TU patience Resources Grobe friendship backcast explore suspender fishing Joey float Floating Fly rods fishing tips spawning Fly Fishing fighting fish fly patterns Orvis brookies Christmas Lights solitude last cast conservation Headbanger Sculpin Euro-Nymphing tight line nymphing indicator fishing DIY musician Fish Hard ice fly tying Baseball Wild vs Stocked hiking regulations Whiskey wading boots poetry camera montana favorite bar boots summertime fishing family Float Fishing Trout Unlimited simplicity mayfly tippet casting thunderstorm How it Started wild trout wet fly fishing science matters time Central PA Fly Casting Namer wet flies angler types One Great Tip Davy Wotten the Mono Rig Big Trout Wild Brown Trout