Streamside | 86,000 Miles and the Unassessed Waters Initiative

by | Oct 27, 2017 | 0 comments

 

Protecting our rivers and the fish that live there — that’s the mission, isn’t it? That’s what so many good people and anglers work toward.

Trout Unlimited has partnered with the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat commission to search for and protect undiscovered wild trout streams. Why does this matter?

Pennsylvania has 86,000 miles of streams. And we still don’t know what fish swim in much of that water.

This beautifully filmed six minute video explains the Unassessed Waters Initiative.

Finding and documenting wild trout in one of these streams leads to special protections for that water. Rob Shane, of Trout Unlimited explains:

Pennsylvania’s Wild Trout Water designation affords these streams additional protections under state regulations.

 

This project, the Unassessed Waters Initiative (UWI) spearheaded by the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission, has led to the discovery of wild trout in more than 40 percent of streams surveyed.

 

And over the past year, Pennsylvania has protected more than 1,000 miles of newly identified wild trout streams.

This is important work. Let’s help keep it going.

Find Shane’s full article here and learn more about the Unassessed Waters Initiative, learn why it matters, and what you can do to help.

Enjoy the day
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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