troutbitten PA Gold

Streamside | All that Glitters — Gink & Gasoline on Golden Trout

by | Aug 10, 2017 | 1 comment

Louis Cahill submitted a public service announcement for the fly fishing community the other day. With his post “All That Glitters,” the Gink and Gasoline author, photographer and fishing guide cleared up the mess about what a real Golden Trout is.

And it’s not a hatchery mutant.

Louis writes about the hatchery-born palomino rainbow trout: “They are at once kind of cool and the highest level of bullshit.”

Nice.

We have our own love/hate relationship with the Pennsylvania Golden Rainbow. Yes, unfortunately, that’s what the PA fish commission calls them. But the Troutbitten guys call them PA Gold.

Read: Admiration — a short tale about some eager PA Gold

Louis points out that real Golden Trout are gorgeous and rare fish, native to the Kern River drainage in California.

Yes, it’s all fishing. And yes, they’re all trout. But no, they’re not all the same.

Read: All That Glitters on Gink and Gasoline

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

troutbitten PA Gold

“They are at once kind of cool and the highest level of bullshit.” – L. Cahill — Photo by Bill Dell

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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