The Pennsylvania Wild Trout Summit is Coming

by | Jul 20, 2017 | 0 comments

Wild trout are the heart of Troutbitten. We chase these fish so we can be part of the extraordinary places where they’re found, if just for a little while. Eventually, the environs become part of us, and we carry a piece of the river inside our own thoughts and desires. The trout are there too, as an ever-present challenge forcing us to wonder and scheme and stock fly boxes for the next time we make it to the water. Without the trout — without wild trout — what we reach for would not be the same.

We believe wild trout are rare and special enough to be protected — and to be respected.

We believe that hatchery trout should not be stocked over a healthy wild population — not on public water and not on private water.

We believe that Pennsylvania should move past the put-and-take culture of hatchery trout, and toward valuing sustainable wild fisheries wherever possible.

— — — — — —

The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission is hosting a Wild Trout Summit, concerning “The Future of Wild Trout in Pennsylvania.”

The event is Saturday, August 26, 2017, from 9:30 am – 4:00 pm.

The public is encouraged to attend. Registration is free, but required.

If you care about wild trout in Pennsylvania, please attend the summit.

 

Photo by Chris Kehres

 

I’ll see you there.

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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