Backcast | Take Five

by | Jun 10, 2017 | 0 comments

Here’s one from the Troutbitten archives, an on-the-water story with one of my favorite tips stuck in the middle.

Take Five

… The lack of production today is killing me. I’ve looked forward to this trip for weeks: tying flies, scanning maps, reviewing old photos and telling stories to anyone fishy enough to listen. I missed this river.

… Yesterday I convinced myself that just being here is enough, but now, halfway through a three-day fishing trip, I’m getting restless, and I need more than scenery and rekindled memories to fill me up.

… I’ve done this long enough to know that when you can’t catch fish where you are, then you probably can’t catch fish where you aren’t either. Relocation is for irresolute quitters and hopeless dreamers. I’m staying put.

Read — Take Five

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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