All the Things

by | May 17, 2017 | 12 comments

There’s the fly box with a broken hinge. Half of the pin on the backside is missing, and I don’t know how that happened. I do know I’ll be standing in fast water someday; I’ll unfold the box, and the open leaf will fall off. I won’t even have a chance for a proper goodbye to the drowned flies and wasted hours — no, the days — of ordinary time spent focused on one square inch of space (that’s what fly tying is). So I’ll fix the hinge today. I could transfer all the flies to a new box, but that would probably take more time.

There’s a two-hundred yard spool of fluorocarbon on the table, newly labeled and boxed with all the shiny stickers indicating what incredible advancements in technology have now been delivered into my hands. It’s true. The monofilaments we fish with now are thinner and stronger than ever. It’s worth the extra dollars, but I still cut the corners. I’ll transfer the fluoro from its large and bulky housing onto a few small tippet spools. I’ll write “4X” on each one, and thread them onto the holster of my vest. I’ll make sure that connection is solid too, because I learned my lesson one lousy afternoon in Montana — all eight spools were lost. I wasn’t consumed and engaged with all the things back then.

READ: Troutbitten | Fly Shop Fluorocarbon too Expensive? Try Some Finesse

There’s another hole in my waders too — somewhere. It’s almost summer and pretty warm now, so dry waders aren’t mission critical, but the last time out I shivered with a cold and soggy foot. Then I walked a mile and got it all steamy in there. Miserable. So I’ll work on it. It’s a seam leak, and it’ll take longer to find and properly patch.

This is how fly fishing becomes a way of life. It develops into a daily activity of one fishing thing or another, ever present in thought. And you’re always working to either maintain or move forward. You don’t dare let it slip backward, because you’ll regret it. You’ve heard the laments from those who “used to fish a lot,” and you won’t let that happen.

All the things. It’s what make us fishermen and not just guys who wet a line once in awhile. There’s a little bit of pleasure in these common chores and routines. It’s something we accept and then grow to love.

Another rod guide pulled out of its thread wraps and antique lacquer as I bushwhacked through a thicket last Monday, so I’ll replace it with part of a paperclip and some electrical tape. Yes, a $700 rod, and that’s the fix. Good enough. It keeps me fishing.

My boots need fresh studs or aluminum bars. I could use new ones, but I can walk in these for a few more months.

The set screw on the reel handle needs tightened. I remember it wiggled the last time I was out.

The nail knot on the fly line looks old.

Split shot is low.

And the rusty truck needs an oil change after I rotate the tires.

All the things. Then I’ll fish.

The water looks perfect.

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

 

Share This Article . . .

Since 2014 and 600 articles deep
Troutbitten is a free resource for all anglers
Your support is greatly appreciated

– Explore These Post Tags –

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

More from this Category

VIDEO: The River Doesn’t Owe You Anything

VIDEO: The River Doesn’t Owe You Anything

Today, I’m proud to announce the launch of Troutbitten videos, in collaboration with Wilds Media. The journey begins with a video adaptation of, “The River Doesn’t Owe You Anything.” This story has been a Troutbitten favorite since it was published in the spring of 2019. . . . The river gives you what you need. The river gives you what you earn.

The Secret

The Secret

There are two kinds of secret places, I suppose: one’s that are truly tucked away somewhere unknown, and ones that lies right underneath a fisherman’s nose. This place harbors a little of both . . .

Riverside

Riverside

Smith and I hopped the guardrail as traffic whizzed by at sixty miles an hour. Smith went first, with his rod tip trailing behind, and he sliced through the brush like a hunter. I followed with probably too much gear for a three hour trip and a puppy in my arms. River is our family’s eleven week old Australian Shepherd, and with a name like that, he has no choice but to become a great fishing dog. Time on the water will do it . . .

Aiden’s First Brown Trout

Aiden’s First Brown Trout

Hundreds of times Aiden has snagged the bottom, pulled the rod back, and either asked me if that was a fish or has told me flatly, “I think that was a fish.”  This time, he finally experienced the certainty that a couple of good head shakes from a trout will give you . . .

Waves and Water

Waves and Water

. . . But when all of that dries up, when the travel seems too long, when dawn comes too early and when chasing a bunch of foot-long trout seems like something you’ve already done, then what’s left — always — is the river . . .

The Foundation

The Foundation

There is tranquility and stillness here — a place to do nothing but think. And that alone is valuable. Because there aren’t many places like this left in the world . . .

What do you think?

Be part of the Troutbitten community of ideas.
Be helpful. And be nice.

12 Comments

  1. Very moving and perceptive, Dom. In many ways, we are are such stuff, and on such stuff we make our dreams.

    Reply
  2. Where to you buy a 200 yard spool of flourocarbon?

    Reply
    • Hi Trevor. Look for brands such as Seaguar and P-Line. They sell larger spools, marketed to gear guys. I’ve been buying those spools and using them for my tippet for years. Not all of it is great though. Look for 100% fluoro in a high breaking strength per diameter, and look for a relatively limp fluoro.

      I really like Seaguar Finesse right now.

      Cheers.

      Reply
  3. Sage recently changed their warranty policy and rods that are not in production now cost $75 and models that are ten years old or more cost $125. $25 for a current rod though! The paperclip fix makes more sense now for an older rod like the Z!

    Reply
    • See, I don’t really think that’s fair. When I buy a rod, I buy it in part because of the warranty. If the warranty when I bought it was a $25 replacement fee, then it should stay that way. Of course, I’m sure there’s fine print in the policy that states they can do whatever the hell they want.

      Reply
      • Agreed. I purchase fly rods with warranty in mind as well, since I’m kind of hard on my gear and have broken numerous rods. I think when the Z-Axis came out, the warranty expense was around $50 for all rods, but I’m not positive. Then it bumped up to $75 for all rods. Now they’ve broken it up into tiers, which is great if you own a current production rod, but stinks if you’re fishing classic rods or recently discontinued rods. Could be an attempt to create an extra incentive to keep buying the latest and greatest rods. But I agree when purchasing a premium rod, it’s unfair to not have a consistent warranty expense for the life of the rod. A $700+ rod should be covered for many years of use at a reasonable repair fee.

        Reply
  4. my favorite …trailer lights

    Reply
  5. Simple pleasures when we can’t be on the water.

    Reply
  6. So true! Not a single day goes by that I don’t do some fly fishing chore….and I love every one of them.

    Reply
  7. that perfect water always calls at the wrong time…

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recent Articles

Recent Posts

Pin It on Pinterest