The further you walk, the more you leave behind

by | Apr 4, 2017 | 6 comments

I wrote an article about the pleasure of solitude and the distances we’ll go to get there. It’s titled “The further you walk the more you leave behind,” and it’s available at this Hatch Magazine link.

Here are a few excerpts:

… This should be early enough, but you feel late. You hurry through the rituals, clearing all the steps for gearing up with a growing anticipated dread that someone else will arrive and spoil the moment. You hear the growl of an engine coming over the hill, but it’s only imagination. The fact is, you’re alone and it’s still not enough. You can feel the pressure of communities, of people and things. It’s coming from behind. You want to feel lonesome again, so you walk.

… Below an enormous rock outcropping lay the remains of mid-sized trees that couldn’t hold onto the limestone any longer, and it’s here that you veer off toward the river to a place called the Slot. It’s a hard and bouldered bend in the river with nasty, roiling, chaotic, loud, crashing water that never stops. You’d walk twice as far if it got you here every time.

… Twice, you spot the movement of a deer and think it’s a man. In those split seconds you feel you’ve lost something, and you’re relieved when the loneliness returns.

— — — — — —

Find the full article over at Hatch Magazine.

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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6 Comments

  1. What a great read. I feel the same way when I can’t seem to rig up fast enough and go running into the river like I’m some flyfishing snob, “This is my spot. I was here first”. I tend to like winter fishing more because I’m the only nut out there. By the way I tied a mono rig and liked it a lot. It feels like I’m cheating and is so much easier. Opened my eyes as to what you can do with flyfishing. It’s like I’m breaking some rule I was taught. Thanks for all the info.

    Reply
    • Vincent,

      Nice. I’m very glad the Mono Rig is working for you.

      Yeah, winter solitude is my favorite. Even the plants, insects and most animals are dormant. It makes for a very lonely feeling if you get out there pretty far. That charges me back up somehow.

      Reply
  2. Just am finding your blog. Love the story. It’s classic. Thank you for being willing to share your work, tips and adventures.

    Reply
    • Right on. Very glad you enjoy the site, Bob. Keep in touch.

      Reply
      • I walk so far to get away from people and the idea that I’ll find a fish that sees little to no pressure and he will be mine. That article/quote really hit home. Ties in with that article you wrote about not knowing when that next “moment” is going to come. Great reads. It hit deep.

        Reply
        • Thanks for taking the time to comment, Zak. I’m really glad you connect with the stories.

          Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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