Clean ’em up! — Little Juniata River and Spring Creek cleanup days

by | Apr 3, 2017 | 2 comments

We need your help. River cleanup days for the Little Juniata River and Spring Creek are just around the corner.

This may come as a surprise, but every day you spend helping a river earns you four months of good fishing mojo with the fishing gods. True story. That’ll take you all the way into the summertime, if you think about it.

If all you do is fish these rivers, then it might be time to give something back. Trash doesn’t pick itself up. Washing machines don’t make good trout habitat. And leaking paint cans aren’t just an eyesore.

I don’t know how all this stuff gets into the water, but it does. Please give a little of your time to help remove the trash and other junk from your favorite rivers.

— The Little Juniata River cleanup day is this Saturday, April 8.

— The Spring Creek cleanup day is April 22.

— Both start at 9:00 am.

Here’s the press release:

— — — — — —

Volunteers Needed
for Watershed Cleanup Days

The Little Juniata River Association (LJRA) is looking for volunteers to help out with the cleanup of the Lil J (in particular the Lil J Natural Area between Spruce Creek & the downstream village of Barree).

The cleanup starts at 9am and ends at lunch time.

This is the 12th annual LJRA effort to clean up the Little Juniata River and the 6th annual effort to clean the remote Natural Area by boat and by foot. We are looking to float & hike through the Natural Area, collect trash as we go and deposit the trash at the parking area at Barree. All boaters with experience in canoes and kayaks are welcome. Hikers/non-boaters are also needed to walk the riverbank and will be ferried across river to problem areas and shuttled as needed.

Car shuttles to and from Barree will be provided. This is a fun day on one of the most beautiful water gaps in Pennsylvania. Coffee, donuts & Tastycakes will be provided between 8:30 & 9am.

Pizza and refreshments afterwards at the Spruce Creek Tavern. Bags and gloves will be provided. All volunteers should meet at the Spruce Creek United Methodist Church parking lot by 8:45am. Please join us! See you on the river.

If interested, please contact:

John Corr: johncorr51@gmail.com

Bill Anderson: bjuniata@verizon.net

LJRA website: www.littlejuniata.org

Annual Spring Creek
Watershed Cleanup Day
Saturday, April 22

April 22nd is the Annual Spring Creek Watershed Cleanup Day. We will be meeting at 9:00 am at three locations:
  • Rock Road Parking Lot
  • McCoy Dam Parking Lot
  • Pull off at Slab Cabin Run, just above Centre Hills.
To volunteer please contact Lynn Mitchell (lynnmitch74@gmail.com). Let Lynn know which location and he will try to accommodate you.
All volunteers are invited to a picnic at Tussey Mountain Pond after the Cleanup. The food will really be good, so don’t miss it.

— — — — — —

Please help out. You’ll meet some wonderful people, feel good about yourself and bank some good fishing mojo. And you never know what you might find …

Photo by Austin Dando

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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2 Comments

  1. Ordered poly yarn from your source and received it two days ago. I like it! Should work well for my CET wings.
    (as well as Dorsey indicators)

    Reply
    • I like it! Good to hear that. Funny how what seems to be the same kinds of yarn can be so different from one another.

      Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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