Clean ’em up! — Little Juniata River and Spring Creek cleanup days

by | Apr 3, 2017 | 2 comments

We need your help. River cleanup days for the Little Juniata River and Spring Creek are just around the corner.

This may come as a surprise, but every day you spend helping a river earns you four months of good fishing mojo with the fishing gods. True story. That’ll take you all the way into the summertime, if you think about it.

If all you do is fish these rivers, then it might be time to give something back. Trash doesn’t pick itself up. Washing machines don’t make good trout habitat. And leaking paint cans aren’t just an eyesore.

I don’t know how all this stuff gets into the water, but it does. Please give a little of your time to help remove the trash and other junk from your favorite rivers.

— The Little Juniata River cleanup day is this Saturday, April 8.

— The Spring Creek cleanup day is April 22.

— Both start at 9:00 am.

Here’s the press release:

— — — — — —

Volunteers Needed
for Watershed Cleanup Days

The Little Juniata River Association (LJRA) is looking for volunteers to help out with the cleanup of the Lil J (in particular the Lil J Natural Area between Spruce Creek & the downstream village of Barree).

The cleanup starts at 9am and ends at lunch time.

This is the 12th annual LJRA effort to clean up the Little Juniata River and the 6th annual effort to clean the remote Natural Area by boat and by foot. We are looking to float & hike through the Natural Area, collect trash as we go and deposit the trash at the parking area at Barree. All boaters with experience in canoes and kayaks are welcome. Hikers/non-boaters are also needed to walk the riverbank and will be ferried across river to problem areas and shuttled as needed.

Car shuttles to and from Barree will be provided. This is a fun day on one of the most beautiful water gaps in Pennsylvania. Coffee, donuts & Tastycakes will be provided between 8:30 & 9am.

Pizza and refreshments afterwards at the Spruce Creek Tavern. Bags and gloves will be provided. All volunteers should meet at the Spruce Creek United Methodist Church parking lot by 8:45am. Please join us! See you on the river.

If interested, please contact:

John Corr: johncorr51@gmail.com

Bill Anderson: bjuniata@verizon.net

LJRA website: www.littlejuniata.org

Annual Spring Creek
Watershed Cleanup Day
Saturday, April 22

April 22nd is the Annual Spring Creek Watershed Cleanup Day. We will be meeting at 9:00 am at three locations:
  • Rock Road Parking Lot
  • McCoy Dam Parking Lot
  • Pull off at Slab Cabin Run, just above Centre Hills.
To volunteer please contact Lynn Mitchell (lynnmitch74@gmail.com). Let Lynn know which location and he will try to accommodate you.
All volunteers are invited to a picnic at Tussey Mountain Pond after the Cleanup. The food will really be good, so don’t miss it.

— — — — — —

Please help out. You’ll meet some wonderful people, feel good about yourself and bank some good fishing mojo. And you never know what you might find …

Photo by Austin Dando

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

Share This Article . . .

Since 2014 and 900+ articles deep
Troutbitten is a free resource for all anglers.
Your support is greatly appreciated.

– Explore These Post Tags –

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

More from this Category

When Gear Gets In the Way

When Gear Gets In the Way

No matter what we’re into, there’s a time when the learning of skills reaches a critical mass, when it’s time to do rather than read more about it and buy more gear.
. . .There’s a time for learning. There’s time for preparation. And then there’s time for doing — for putting all of it into practice, making the casts, covering water and catching fish . . .

Angler Types in Profile — The Fly Tying Artist

Angler Types in Profile — The Fly Tying Artist

It’s easy to understand how tying flies makes you a better angler. And many fly fishermen take their passion for the river directly over to the vise. With that passion follows artistry. And for that kind of artist, what is wound around wire and bound to a hook comes with beauty . . . or there is no point.

One of the best tyers I’ve ever known would tie a dozen of the same fly and keep only two or three, stripping the rest with a razor blade to the bare hook. Why? He said he only fished the ones that had a soul . . .

Hook Sets Are Not Free

Hook Sets Are Not Free

Mike had landed on a common phrase that usually triggers a response from me. It’s one of the myths of fly fishing, and it carries too much consequence to let it go. Hook sets are not free. There’s a price to pay. Oftentimes that cost is built into our success. And other times, the costs of too frequently setting the hook pile up, stealing away our limited opportunities . . .

Will An Expensive Fly Rod Catch You More Trout?

Will An Expensive Fly Rod Catch You More Trout?

A great fly rod responds to the angler. The slightest motions and refinements in the cast are transmitted to the rod, and it flexes — it responds in kind. The angler’s thoughts and instincts flow through a great rod, so our accuracy and adjustments become effortless.

We can be in tune with a great rod and perfectly connect with its performance. With some time spent fishing a great fly rod, it becomes an extension of our will. The fly hits the target because we want it to. The leader lands with s-curves in the tippet because that’s what we decided. And the rod makes it happen.

A go-to fly rod is like an old dog or a good friend. We know them, and our connection is natural.

Who Knows Better Than You?

Who Knows Better Than You?

Anglers cling to the stories and accounts others. We believe in the experts. We want masters of this craft to exist and to tell us the answers.

Sure, you might have a group of wild trout dialed in for the better part of a season. Maybe it’s a midge hatch every summer morning, or a streamer bite on fall evenings, for one hour on either side of dusk.

But it will end. That’s what’s so special about chasing trout. Like the wings of a mayfly spinner, predictability is a fading ghost . . .

What do you think?

Be part of the Troutbitten community of ideas.
Be helpful. And be nice.

2 Comments

  1. Ordered poly yarn from your source and received it two days ago. I like it! Should work well for my CET wings.
    (as well as Dorsey indicators)

    Reply
    • I like it! Good to hear that. Funny how what seems to be the same kinds of yarn can be so different from one another.

      Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recent Articles

Recent Posts

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

Pin It on Pinterest