Streamside | Kelly Galloup with Reno Fly Shop Podcast

by | Mar 14, 2017 | 3 comments

Sinking into a podcast while tying flies or traveling to the river is one of my favorite ways to relax and learn something at the same time.

Reno Fly Shop has put out some fantastic podcasts lately, and their latest two part — nearly two hour — chat with Kelly Galloup sets a new standard for this type of conversational episode.

If you’re a streamer junkie — strike that — if you like fishing, then you’ll enjoy listening to Galloup’s jocular reflections. If you know Kelly then you won’t be surprised to find him candid and amusing in both episodes. This is how podcasts should be done.

A few highlights …

— Why Galloup agrees that a lot of fly guys are assholes.

— Galloup’s take on competition fly fishing.

— Galloup says, “Stalk more. Cast less,” and “Hunt it, don’t hope it.”

— Question: Do big articulated streamers allow you to catch bigger fish? Galloup: “No.”

— Why Galloup says real fish always, always, always eat the head first.

Find the podcast at Reno Fly Shop’s website, on iTunes, or wherever you get your podcasts.

Thanks to Reno Fly Shop for the entertainment and education on our way to the rivers.

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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3 Comments

  1. Hi Domenick,
    Thanks for posting this podcast. I’ll tie some flies and listen to it tonight. Just from reading your excerpts, I already like it.
    Bruce

    Reply
  2. I listened to both parts of the podcast and I really enjoyed them. Kelly sounds like a guy with whom I’d like to hang. I fish with some guys who would be appalled by his thoughts. They are pseudo-intellectuals that think it’s ungodly to fish with anything, but dry flies. Some other guys think fishing jigs is not fly fishing, etc. etc. He hit the nail on the head, have fun! The idea is to have some fun. Times are much better now for learning about the sport with advent of the computer. When I was growing up, you couldn’t get any information out of fly tiers and fishers. It was a secret society like Knights Templar in The Da Vinci Code.

    Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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