High Light — Low Light

by | Feb 22, 2017 | 2 comments

My article, “High Light — Low Light,” is over at Hatch Magazine. Here are a few excerpts…..

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… Finding the shady cracks that harbor resting and wary trout is a good challenge on bright days. Offering the flies to them in those small and dark spots is another.

… Brown trout are especially averse to hard sun. They are negatively phototropic, which is a ten-dollar phrase for “don’t like bright lights.” Sure, trout will feed under direct light, but it usually takes a hatch or another significant event to break them out of their wary instincts and face the sunlight.

… I do all that I can to keep direct sunlight behind or to the side of trout. I know what direction my local rivers flow, and I purposely choose to fish ones that flows east on early, clear mornings (keeping the sun behind the fish). I know where the big bends in the river are, and I happily walk two hundred yards to change the angle at which the sunlight reaches the trout. It’s worth it.

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Find the full article at Hatch Magazine.

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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2 Comments

  1. Good article, and a lot of guys don’t understand it, but it sure is true.

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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