The Tactical Fly Fisher

by | Jun 24, 2016 | 0 comments


TacticalFlyFisherLogo

Tactical Fly Fisher. No doubt, Devin Olsen chose the correct name for his operation.

Every week, I  receive a few emails asking for more details on nymphing rigs and other technical fly fishing topics (keep them coming), and while I usually have some answers and ideas to share, I often find myself redirecting friends to the sources that have answered my own questions and inspired my own ideas for catching more trout. Devin Olsen is one of those sources.

Fishing is something you can enjoy at any level. Throwing a simple bobber and worm into a summer pond can bring as much satisfaction and happiness as competing in the World Fly Fishing Championship in Bosnia. Pretty sure Devin’s done both.

There’s something to be said for fishing simply. Throwing a few casts just to get on the water with friends or making the solo trip to clear your head is a good thing. But simple fishing doesn’t always put fish in the net,and taking a step forward into topics and tactics may be confusing for a while, but it pays dividends in the form of big fish numbers and bigger fish.

Digging in and learning all the adjustments and variations possible in fly fishing becomes a satisfaction all it’s own, and eventually, that thirst for the next new strategy becomes just as fun as the “simple” fishing was.

If you’re ready to improve your nymphing game, Devin’s blog at Tactical Fly Fisher is one hell of a resource.

Fair warning here: the material presented is often dense — in a very, very good way. To present some of the stuff Devin covers, it has to be … because it’s a lot of information packed into every paragraph. Devin’s technical posts are the kind you can read over and over again, finding something new with each pass. So, give things time to soak in. Try them on the water, and then come back — it may take a while. Find it too confusing? Try harder. The reward is on the other side.

Devin’s latest blog entry covers a technique for fishing in difficult, windy conditions by using an uncommon dry-dropper variation. It’s a rig that I use often, but as always, I learned something new from what he wrote, and I now have more variations to add while on the water.

Olsen writes …

… Euro-nymphing’s Achilles heel happens to be wind. Leader material held off the water is a great kite. In a good blow, if you are tight lining a Euro-rig, your leader will be at the mercy of the breeze. This makes getting a smooth dead drift and detecting strikes more than a little challenging.

… during windy weather, a normally adverse surface-anchoring suspension device helps resist the drift-killing effects of wind.

Devin walks through the rig — the variations and the whys and hows. He gives a complete and thorough coverage of what’s possible.

DevinOlsenDryDropper

Image: Devin Olsen

Leafing through Devin’s blog will keep you busy with new fly fishing tactics for months, and you’ll spend a lifetime mastering them.

Search through the rest of the blog to find fly tutorials and fishing reports. Don’t pass up the reports! In each story are invaluable tips from a truly accomplished fisherman.

Devin Olsen doesn’t just catch a lot of fish. He knows why he catches those fish, and that’s the most important part.

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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