Thirty-Inch Liars

by | Jun 13, 2016 | 6 comments

My story, Thirty-Inch Liars, is over at Hatch Magazine today. Here are a few excerpts…..

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… I once read through a publication that printed, “Thirty-inch wild trout are common in this stretch of water.” Now, I don’t care what river in the continental United States you want to put up as an example. None of them have thirty-inch wild trout as a regular thing and certainly not in my home state of Pennsylvania. And yet, every fisherman in the parking lot seems to have a thirty-inch fish story, don’t they?

… And thirty inches seems to be the benchmark where fantasy replaces reality.

… You know what I hear when someone says a fish was “about two feet long?” I hear: “I didn’t measure the fish.”

… The magnificent brown trout of my dreams suspended aloft, just between the rise and fall of a leaping trout, only ten feet away. I could have reached out and touched him with my rod tip. It was the biggest wild brown trout I’ve ever seen, and it was hooked to my line.

… I did everything I could to hold on, running parallel to him in shallow water, rod tip high, keeping the line tight until he turned at the tailout. One hundred and eighty degrees. And then he faced the current.

— — — — — — — — — —

Find the full article at Hatch Magazine.

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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6 Comments

  1. I couldn’t agree more with your excellent Hatch essay . I loved your line “You know what I hear when someone says a fish was “about two feet long?” I hear: “I didn’t measure the fish.”” It’s not exactly that you are calling the guy a liar, but when someone catches a 20″-24+” fish on most rivers it is a rare event and you want to know whether it is 20″ or 24+.” As you pointed out those few inches make a huge difference. Just knowing that a big fish lives in your river changes your perspective. It’s like hiking in grizzly country. You don’t see them often, but knowing they are around heightens your experience.

    Reply
    • Dan, you perfectly described why measuring to those benchmarks is important to me too. Cheers.

      Reply
  2. I loved the story. Here’s mine. 15 inches is a real trophy and I don’t care whether someone believes me or not. I did see a pair of brown trout that were for sure pushing 30 several years ago. They were doing the mating dance and I was too embarrassed to take pictures.

    Reply
    • Howard, what state? A pair of wild thirties, you think?

      And I agree, for sure, that fifteen is where “Good Trout” starts.

      Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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