The Kid

by | May 4, 2016 | 6 comments

My story, The Kid, is over at Hatch Magazine today.  Here are a couple excerpts…

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… The kid was ten years old and small for his age, but his legs were strong and he waded without fear. He fished hard. We shared a passion and a singular focus, so I enjoyed having him on the water. He stood just tall enough not to lose him in a field of goldenrod and he weighed less than the family dog. But he was sturdy, tough and determined, with an unwavering perseverance that kept him focused during the inevitable slow days with a fly rod.

… The kid fell repeatedly into the leftover trenches overgrown with deep green plants. I turned once to see his hands pushing himself upright against the mossy ground. We shared a grin, and then we pushed forward. We walked for hours. 

… The fishing was as it should be in such a remote place. We threw dry flies into the black and brown corners of falling water, hooking native brook trout gems as small as the kid’s fingers and no larger than my hand. The water flowed down the mountain as we moved up and through it. We climbed a watery trail that narrowed as the hours past. 

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Find the full article at Hatch Magazine.

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

 

 

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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6 Comments

  1. That was very much me three decades ago. In some ways it still is – but I can usually see over the weeds and fall in fewer trenches these days …..

    Reply
  2. Another wonderful story Domenick. Masterfully told.

    Reply
  3. What a great post, with some unbelievable images—just found your blog—thanks for sharing

    Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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