Cherry Picking or Full Coverage?

by | Apr 4, 2016 | 0 comments

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Today, Hatch Magazine published an article that I wrote about two different approaches on the river. Here are a few excerpts …

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… Like a slow and silent time-lapse parade, over the span of an hour, the next fisherman took the position of the one before him, casting to the same water at the same angles — interchangeable, carbon copy approaches. 

… Seemingly built into the fishiest guys is an innate ability to know where a trout will choose to spend its hours resting and feeding. Just as a heron understands where to stand patiently on point, awaiting its next meal, some men, born to fish, read the water with instinct and precision. The rest of us must learn this skill through trial and error.

… What struck me that day was how ingrained our habits really are. The fishermen’s paths along popular rivers lead from one prime spot to another, leaving a lot of good in-between water mostly unfished, and if I don’t actively think and plan a different approach, I catch myself following these paths simply because they are so inviting.

… Full coverage of the river, however, reveals a lot more about trout habits and opens up opportunities to grow into a more complete angler. Once you catch on to the rhythm of the process, it’s a fun way to fish.

— — — — — — — —

Find the full article over at Hatch Magazine.

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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