Fair-weather or foul-weather | Troutbitten on Hatch Magazine

by | Mar 5, 2016 | 0 comments

Photo by Pat Burke


Hatch Magazine
published an article that I wrote. You can find it here.

“Truth is, most diehard fishermen aren’t all that diehard. A lot of fishermen are looking for reasons not to fish. Sound absurd? I’ve had enough people cancel plans to believe it. I also live within walking distance of the most popular wild trout stream in Pennsylvania, and I regularly observe some predictable habits of the fair-weather fisherman: he loves the sun, hates the rain, wants it warm but not hot, fears the cold, and doesn’t like mornings much.”

…..

“Luke’s obligatory fifteen has passed, and I’m starting to wonder. The hot coffee helps fight off radiating cold from cinder blocks and a concrete floor, and the timing of distant thunder mixed with the patter of rhythmic rain in puddles form stanzas that mark time, slipping further toward the daylight. I’d like to get more from this moment, but I’m tired, and the small garage makes me feel trapped and surrounded. A lot of my long week felt that way too. I’m ready for the open water.”

Read the rest over at Hatch.

 

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
T R O U T B I T T E N
domenick@troutbitten.com

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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