Last Call For Comment On DHALO Regs Change

by | Mar 15, 2015 | 4 comments

pafbc

The sixty-day period allotted by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission for comments on the proposed changes to specially regulated waters designated Delayed Harvest Artificial Lures Only (DHALO) is coming to an end.

I’m not going to go into a diatribe here listing the reasons that the proposal is a bad idea. Suffice it to say that most dedicated anglers interested enough to read this blog would find it in their own interest to fight hard against these proposed changes.

It’s easy to be disenchanted with the political system these days and to believe that voicing your opinion doesn’t matter. However, when it comes to the PFBC through the years, I have seen public comments have a great effect on the ultimate decisions that are made. Your letter will make a difference because, the truth is, most anglers will not take the time to write. Please send a letter.

PFBC Executive Director John Arway
Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission
P.O. Box 67000, Harrisburg, PA 17106-7000

You can read more about the changes on PaFlyFish.

Here’s an excerpt from Dave Kile:

The Pennsylvania Board of Fish and Boat (PFBC) Commissioners proposed major changes to the existing delayed-harvest-artificial-lures-only (DHALO) stream sections when they met on January 21-22. Anglers who enjoy the special regulation waters will find trout harvested earlier and be sharing these streams with some who will be able to fish live bait year round if these changes go through January 1, 2016 …….

Although it may seem absurd in 2015 that a physical letter is needed, I’ve been told by multiple sources that letters in a mailbox have the greatest impact.  There are only a few days left to speak your mind.

Enjoy the day.
Domenick Swentosky
domenick@troutbitten.com

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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4 Comments

  1. Do not change the regulation there is no need. Please remember your theme.
    Resource first. Opening it early does nothing for the resource, artificial lures/flies has proven to be less harmful and let the fish spread out and live before being yanked out. The regs are fine where they are. More catch and release follows the theme Resources first. Please vote no for the health of the fish.

    Reply
  2. i am in total DISAGREEMENT with the proposal. It will not work. Everyone knows trout will swallow bait whole. When baitfishers fish bait and use a barbed hook, trout always swallow bait whole. It is deeply swallowed. It is impossible to catch and release and a trout that deeply swallows a barbed hook. Trout always die from this scenario. So how can these new regulations work? Fact is they won’t.

    Bottom line, keep current regulations as they are.

    Reply
  3. Leave the dehalo areas alone its the only place we have good fishing all spring long where they can’t be fished out. I know if not for the dehalo I will not purchase a trout stamp. I will fish other species.

    Reply
  4. Steven, John, and Tim, thanks for the replies. I agree with you. Please be sure to send a letter if you haven’t already!

    Reply

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Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

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