Night Shift – Skunked

by | Dec 17, 2014 | 0 comments

I’ve read a lot of fishing blogs, and I can’t recall any accounts of a complete shut out.  I’ve seen lots of hero poses with gorgeous slabs of wild trout spilling over wet, dripping hands with the flash of a fly rod reflecting in the sun. My RSS feed is filled with accounts of banner days, perfect trips and fish with the feed bag on.  How about this …..

wpid-wp-1418824013608.jpeg
I’ve night fished a hell of a lot this year and I plan to keep doing it all through the winter.  Why? Because nobody else is, and because I’m curious.  I was talking with my buddy Matt Grobe after my last night trip, and he suggested that I should travel  more often and put myself over bigger fish for bigger payoff.  In truth, I’ve fished my home stream on about 75% of my night outings through the years. In large part,that’s because of the simple convenience — I can be on the stream in less than five minutes — but also because I know that water inside and out. It’s far and away the most consistent creek I’ve ever fished, and if I strike out I know that it certainly isn’t because there were no fish around.

Night fishing is like learning to fish all over again, and my plan has been to fish my home stream often, developing the night skills in the same places where I learned just about everything else about fishing. As the weather has turned colder, I’ve questioned whether I will still be able to find active fish feeding in the dark, and my plan for winter night fishing was to keep fishing my home stream more often than anywhere else, just to try to keep that one friendly element in my favor. However, last night I traveled to a location that we know for a fact holds Whiskey Drinkers and wild brown trout looking for a name.

Three hours. Never had a bump. I had a plan to fish about five sections that I knew well, and I worked all of that water hard; swinging wets and streamers mostly, and then mixing in some dead drifts. The highlight of the night was the monster that I spooked out of some thin water while walking through to the bank.  He waited until I was about to step on him before he bolted, leaving a large wake in my red beam and a fantastic “BLUNK” sound.  Yes, I had just fished that shallow pretty hard.

Ready for the excuses? How about these: it was foggy, the water was cold, the bait-chuckers raped and pillaged that water over the weekend, the sky was too bright, barometric pressure was  low, and “them fishes just wasn’t bitin’.”

Fish count – zero.  Redemption awaits.

wpid-wp-1418823075460.jpeg

Share This Article . . .

Since 2014 and 600 articles deep
Troutbitten is a free resource for all anglers
Your support is greatly appreciated

– Explore These Post Tags –

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

More from this Category

Cicadas, Sawyer and the Clinic

Cicadas, Sawyer and the Clinic

Just as the Cicada settled again, with its deer hair wing coming to rest and its rubber legs still quivering, the pool boss came to finish what he started. His big head engulfed the fly, and my patience finally released into a sharp hookset on 3X. The stout hook buried itself against the weight of a big trout . . .

You Need Contact

You Need Contact

Success in fly fishing really comes down to one or two things. It’s a few key principles repeated over and over, across styles, across water types and across continents. The same stuff catches trout everywhere. And one of those things . . . is contact.

. . . No matter what adaptations are made to the rig at hand, the game is about being in touch with the fly. And in some rivers, contact continues by touching the bottom with something, whether that be a fly or a split shot. Without contact, none of this works. Contact is the tangible component between success and failure.

Find Your Rabbit Hole

Find Your Rabbit Hole

Understanding the ideas of other anglers through the decades is how I learn. It’s how we all learn. The names change, but the process remains. We build a framework from others. Then we fit together the pieces of who we are as an angler . . .

One Last Change

One Last Change

Every angler goes fishing to get away from things — and most times that means getting away from people too. So whether they be friends or strangers on the water, going around the bend and walking off gives you back what you were probably looking for in the first place . . .

Troutbitten State of the Union — 2020 Wrap Up

Troutbitten State of the Union — 2020 Wrap Up

The real joy of having Troutbitten as my career is in all the chances I have to be creative. The articles, presentations, videos, web design, and the guided trips — each one is an opportunity to communicate ideas about why we fish, how we fish, and what keeps us wishing to fish, day after day. Thank you for that chance . . .

Walk Along — Jiggy On The Northern Tier

Walk Along — Jiggy On The Northern Tier

This article is part of the Walk Along series. These are first person accounts showing the thoughts, strategies and actions around particular situations on the river, putting the reader in the mind of the angler.

Tuck. Drop. Tick. Lead. Now just a five-inch strip with the rod tip up. Pause slightly for the fly to drop. Focus . . . Fish on!

What do you think?

Be part of the Troutbitten community of ideas.
Be helpful. And be nice.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recent Articles

Recent Posts

Domenick Swentosky

Central Pennsylvania

Hi. I’m a father of two young boys, a husband, author, fly fishing guide and a musician. I fish for wild brown trout in the cool limestone waters of Central Pennsylvania year round. This is my home, and I love it. Friends. Family. And the river.

Pin It on Pinterest